Problem with OS X Update (SMART Errors)

Discussion in 'Mac OS X' started by Endyo, Apr 12, 2018.

  1. Endyo

    Endyo New Member

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    Hello!

    I made this post because I couldn't find any good solution to solve this problem.

    So, recently I came across a problem on my MacBook Pro retina 15" (Late 2013 model). I have this PC for almost a year and most of the time I use windows 10 which is installed on the bootcamp. Recently I booted in OS X and found out that it was outdated and it runs OS X 10.9.5 (Mavericks). So I downloaded the OS X update to update it to High Sierra. When I have to choose disk to install it on, it shows that all disks have s.m.a.r.t. errors. It has 512GB SSD on board (Still original). On my previous research and the tests I have done, I'm sure, that this smart error is because of bootcamp and separated partitions on disk, not because the disk is falling, and all other disk tests were okay, not a single problem. I will add some screenshots bellow.

    I wanted to ask if someone knows any solution to bypass that smart error check on OS X update, because the bootcamp partition of disk is almost full and I don't want to loose any data there. The reason why I want to use OS X too is because the battery life on bootcamp is poor (2-3 hours of usage per charge) and thats because of graphics card windows uses by default (M750). It doesn't detect iris graphics.

    Screenshot at Apr 12 21-18-32.png

    Screenshot at Apr 12 21-31-06.png

    Screenshot at Apr 12 21-34-30.png

    I can later add smart error code if that could help

    Thank you for any suggestions

    Endyo
     
    Endyo, Apr 12, 2018
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  2. Endyo

    honestone New Member

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    What happens when you use Disk Utility to "look at" the SSD?

    Also, given that you use so little space on your Mac partition, you could try and resize the partitions, taking some of the space from the Mac partition and adding it to the Bootcamp one. But to do that, it would be necessary to have a backup. Are you making backups to an external device?
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2018
    honestone, Apr 12, 2018
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  3. Endyo

    Endyo New Member

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    Hello honestone!
    Thanks for your reply. If I open Disk Utility and select SSD, it shows that the drive has a hardware problem that can't be repaired (see in screenshot bellow). I have tried many different solutions on repairing it with no success, but I haven't tried to format it which may lead to success, but that could be time consuming.

    Screenshot at Apr 12 23-10-30.png

    And talking about backups, I don't make any because most of the time I use Windows on this machine as OS X version I have now is 10.9.5 (Maverics). It is super outdated to even install some newer apps what makes it unusable for me.
     
    Endyo, Apr 12, 2018
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  4. Endyo

    honestone New Member

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    Unless the Windows "stuff" on the bootcamp partition is causing issues, kind of surprised an SSD that is "only" 4 1/2 years old would show SMART errors. In October 2013, I replaced the (slow) 5400 rpm drive inside my late 2012 Mac Mini with a fast Samsung 840 Pro 256 gig SSD, and things are still good with it. Similarly, I previously had a mid 2013 13" MacBook Air, with a 252 gig SSD, and even after 5 years of use (I sold it back in December, and got the newer 2017 version of basically the same MacBook Air), the SSD was fine.

    Again, though, I am not a real "heavy" user, nor do I run any Windows software on any of my Macs (whether it's via Bootcamp, or using a "emulation" program like Parallels). Without a backup, it will be risky for you to try and do any diagnostics on your internal SSD.

    Additionally, I actually do not know how to back up the Bootcamp partition. One possible "suggestion" would be for you to purchase a new SSD that could be installed inside your machine. Along with the SSD, purchase an external enclosure (you can get a nice, inexpensive one made by Orico; I have two Samsung 850 Pro 512 gig SSDs installed in separate Orico enclosures, and they work real well). Here is what mine look like:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...Vhq_sCh0qEQ-LEAQYAiABEgK4EfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

    You could then connect that external enclosure to your Mac, use Disk Utility to Erase, Format, and Partition that new SSD, then download the full High Sierra, OS 10.13.4 Installation file from the App Store, and do a clean, fresh, "virgin" installation of High Sierra onto one of the partitions (High Sierra will automatically first re-format that partition as APFS; you have no choice with that, but APFS is OK). I don't know, however, how you would "move" all the "stuff" on the Windows/Bootcamp partition. Maybe someone here could provide guidance as to how you could do that.

    Assuming you get everything onto that new SSD, you would remove it form the external enclosure, replace the one inside your Mac with the new one, install the "bad" SSD inside the external enclosure, and re-start your Mac. You could then perform any diagnostics you want on that old SSD, and if you can "fix it", you could use that SSD as a backup device.

    Again, though, there is the "issue" of the Bootcamp partition.
     
    honestone, Apr 12, 2018
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