Upgrading 15 inch Late 2013 Retina MBP logic board


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Hello,

I am thinking of upgrading my old 15 inch Retina MacBook Pro (Late 2013 core i7 2.0 Ghz, 8GB of RAM), single integrated graphics(IG) processor to give it more CPU power and max up the memory. I'll need to replace the current logic board by a more powerful one but there are plenty of used ones out there (eBay or other platforms). The options I have are the following:

1- Replace the logic board with a 15 inch late 2013 2.6 Ghz, core i7 16 GB (IG) one
or
2- Replace the logic board with a 15 inch late 2013 2.6 Ghz, core i7 16 GB Dual Graphic (DG) one

Or going for a mid-2014 logic board since the hardware of late 2013 and mid-2014 are said to be close to each other:

3- Mount a 15 inch mid-2014 2.8 Ghz, core i7 16 GB Integrated Graphics (IG) logic board
or
4- a 15 inch mid-2014 2.8 Ghz, core i7 16 GB Dual Graphics (IG) logic board

I am pretty sure option 1 (late 2013 IG 16GB) will fit but since this is quite a radical upgrade, I thought I would max-up everything possible. I would like to know:
1- Whether a Dual Graphics logic board will fit in the original 15 inch Late 2013 Retina MBP.
2- Whether a mid-2014 logic board (either IG or DG) will fit in my old MBP.

Anyone experienced with this?
Thanks in advance
 
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Cory Cooper

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Hello and welcome.

Basically, only logic boards from same year models will fit, due to changes in components and port arrangement. It is a fairly involved process to replace the logic board, and internal components can be easily damaged without the proper tools and training.

Is there a particular need to bump up the specs? Honestly, for most basic computer usage, you wouldn't notice that much of a difference. You would when doing larger video, 3D, and other processor-intensive tasks.

C
 
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Joined
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Hello and welcome.

Basically, only logic boards from same year models will fit, due to changes in components and port arrangement. It is a fairly involved process to replace the logic board, and internal components can be easily damaged without the proper tools and training.

Is there a particular need to bump up the specs? Honestly, for most basic computer usage, you wouldn't notice that much of a difference. You would when doing larger video, 3D, and other processor-intensive tasks.

C
Hello Cory,

Thanks for your welcoming words. On numerous places on the net I could read that the late 2013 and mid 2014 hardwares are pretty much compatible with a slight gain in processor power for the mid-2014.

I just wanted to make sure before purchasing the wrong logic board. I am pretty used to replacing internal components on iMacs and MacBook Pros. When you turn to Mac specialists and they would tell you: "not possible or not authorised by Apple or it will cost you more than the current value of your computer, or sorry... too old, you need to buy a new model or a refurbished recent one etc." fair enough but why should I buy the latest models when I know I don't have to? At the end of the day, you learn to fix things by yourself with good used spare parts from e-Bay (or equivalent). I also happen to be quite handy with these things so i's not a point of concern. After several DIY upgrades my late 2009 iMac runs like a Nascar beast.

To your question, the need to max up the specs is indeed: large videos and picture processing, (I am a sport photographer as a serious hobby), next to being a financial expert running cpu/memory consuming simulations.

Back to the topic, my gut feelings tell me that the mid-2014 logic-board might fit but since I haven't been able to get a clear answer on that, I will play it safe and go for the late 2013 part :)

Best, Chris
 

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