Updated to El Capitan 10.11.5 and after reboot all personal files are missing

Joined
May 23, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Afternoon,

I recently updated my Macbook Pro 13-Inch (2012 model according to the 'About this Mac tab') to the latest El Capitan 10.11.5 and upon reboot it no longer contains any of my personal files apart from Itunes music. All documents\photos\video files are nowhere to be found not even in trash. The user accounts are still there, along with browsing history, account logins ect all remain untouched.

I bought the Macbook just over 12 months ago brand new from a retailer and since then have maintained updates when Mac prompts.

I contacted Apple Support regarding the issue and was told that they couldn't help, and that the files were probably deleted by the user, however considering they were there when I started the update, and gone when the update did it's required reboot I am fairly certain this isn't the cause, nor would I delete my entire home folder worth of Uni work and family photos.

I am planning on taking the Mac to a computer repair shop to get the HDD scanned to see if anything is recoverable.

My question is, is there anyway I can recover these files without having to pay for this process?

I am completely new to the world of Mac troubleshooting, with this being the first issue I've had so I shall attempt to reply to any future request for information to the best of my ability.

Thanks for your help in advance.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2013
Messages
45
Reaction score
0
My prob is not as bad as yours I still have my files but since upgrade three days ago lost safari
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
Have you been making backups to an external device?

If Apple was a professional company who cared about it's users, the very first thing any OSX installer/updater would do is throw up this message....

DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT RUNNING THIS INSTALLER UNLESS YOU HAVE A TESTED BACKUP OF YOUR CURRENT MAC SETUP!!!

The addition of this single sentence at the front of OSX installers would cost Apple nothing and save many thousands of people a lot of entirely needless suffering, but Apple can't be bothered to add that sentence, preferring to nurture the marketing fantasy that OSX upgrades are easy, simple and safe because "it just works".
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,846
Reaction score
241
If Apple was a professional company who cared about it's users, the very first thing any OSX installer/updater would do is throw up this message....

DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT RUNNING THIS INSTALLER UNLESS YOU HAVE A TESTED BACKUP OF YOUR CURRENT MAC SETUP!!!

The addition of this single sentence at the front of OSX installers would cost Apple nothing and save many thousands of people a lot of entirely needless suffering, but Apple can't be bothered to add that sentence, preferring to nurture the marketing fantasy that OSX upgrades are easy, simple and safe because "it just works".

It's unfortunate that folks have the (possibly) mistaken impression that Macs are completely safe, "easy" to upgrade, and 100% reliable. Like other things in life, one needs to take the initiative and attempt to learn things on their own, and in many cases, do things on their own.

I equate Apple to Toyota. Both companies produce "reliable" machines that are supposedly trouble free. But, just like Toyotas (and other cars), Macs are machines, and thus require care and maintenance. Toyota (and other automobile manufacturers) do not publish in a "clear" fashion that tires need to be checked for proper air pressure. Besides helping them last longer, gas mileage can be improved. I learned that fact a long, long time ago, but not from any automobile company. I found out on my own.

The same thing, at least for me, was/is the same for Apple machines. I started with an Apple IIE, upgraded to an Apple IIGS, and since 1996, have been using Macs exclusively. In all instances, I learned on my own how to keep such machines as "lean and clean" as possible, along with practicing maintenance techniques. For 99% of the time, I do not have trouble with my machines. And I continue to follow many of those same practices.

It is also good to do things on your own (as much as possible), as one learns about such machines, along with saving money. For our automobiles, for example, I change the Air Filter and the Cabin Air Filter myself every spring. Such tasks are not difficult at all, help maintain our cars, and the parts are WAY less expensive than at a dealership. I have also changed fuses one of our cars myself. Similar tasks can be done on Macs, although for some of the machines, one cannot do anything inside them For example, I swapped out the internal hard drive in my Mac MIni for a much faster SSD, and if needed, I can easily upgrade the memory. But, for my MacBook Air, I can swap out the SSD (although it would be a challenge), but cannot upgrade the memory. But still, I take care of both machines from a software perspective also, including having backups.

I actually suspect Appel "publishes" such a warning somewhere, but it could be difficult to find. That is why it is so important to attempt to be aware of that on their own. The forums on this site are a great resource for many, many issues/things, including the one you are highlighting.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
It's unfortunate that folks have the (possibly) mistaken impression that Macs are completely safe, "easy" to upgrade, and 100% reliable.

Definitely mistaken impression, as proven by the many thousands of threads like this on all the Mac forums. That mistaken impression arises from deliberate decisions at Apple. In some circles such a procedure is called lying.

Like other things in life, one needs to take the initiative and attempt to learn things on their own, and in many cases, do things on their own.

I respectfully decline any and all attempts to shift blame to Mac users like the poster who started this thread, who are simply doing what Apple told them to do. For decades Apple has deliberately built a user base focused on regular folks who aren't nerds. For decades Apple has told them Macs are simple, easy, they "just work". Thus, the failure to add warnings in the installer such as I suggested in my post above is inexcusable.

I equate Apple to Toyota. Both companies produce "reliable" machines that are supposedly trouble free. But, just like Toyotas (and other cars), Macs are machines, and thus require care and maintenance. Toyota (and other automobile manufacturers) do not publish in a "clear" fashion that tires need to be checked for proper air pressure. Besides helping them last longer, gas mileage can be improved. I learned that fact a long, long time ago, but not from any automobile company. I found out on my own.

I'm sorry, but this is part of a longstanding pattern through out Mac culture of rationalizing mediocrity at Apple. We do Apple no favor by this process. If Apple is going to be mediocre, we don't need them, as we already have Windows and Microsoft to perform that function. Steve Jobs is the example we should be following here, a state of eternal dissatisfaction, never being happy with anything until it's as close to perfect as is humanly possible. That mindset is supportive of Apple.

For 99% of the time, I do not have trouble with my machines. And I continue to follow many of those same practices.

Directly before typing this post I attempted to install Yosemite on one of my drives. Installer failed without explanation. If this was any software other than Apple software we would simply say it sucks without having a big debate. I'm just applying the same standard to Apple products that we routinely apply to all other software by all other makers.

Sorry to be so adamant honestone, obviously my complaint is not with you. I'm not really replying to your words but to Mac culture in general which seems to relish celebrating and rationalizing mediocrity. Perhaps Apple has won over too many Windows users who are used to accepting lower standards?

Go to Youtube and watch the famous 1984 themed TV ad which did so much to launch Apple. That's what this post is about. Rage against the mindless machine my friends, just like Apple told you to do.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,846
Reaction score
241
Definitely mistaken impression, as proven by the many thousands of threads like this on all the Mac forums. That mistaken impression arises from deliberate decisions at Apple. In some circles such a procedure is called lying.

Unfortunately, there are just too many Mac users who think things should work as is. They are definitely living in a dream world.

I'm sorry, but this is part of a longstanding pattern through out Mac culture of rationalizing mediocrity at Apple. We do Apple no favor by this process. If Apple is going to be mediocre, we don't need them, as we already have Windows and Microsoft to perform that function. Steve Jobs is the example we should be following here, a state of eternal dissatisfaction, never being happy with anything until it's as close to perfect as is humanly possible. That mindset is supportive of Apple.

I'm not rationalizing mediocrity. Apple, like Toyota, has been on the forefront with their efforts. But again, they are just machines, and machines need TLC, no matter who makes them.

Directly before typing this post I attempted to install Yosemite on one of my drives. Installer failed without explanation. If this was any software other than Apple software we would simply say it sucks without having a big debate. I'm just applying the same standard to Apple products that we routinely apply to all other software by all other makers.

I've read a number of times where folks have successfully installed a Mac OS on an external device. I have never done it, as I have not needed to. But, I suspect, like anything else, one needs to get things ready for such a project.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
Unfortunately, there are just too many Mac users who think things should work as is. They are definitely living in a dream world.

Observe how you keep trying to shift the blame on to Mac users. Note your reluctance to blame Apple for Apple's failures, just as we would routinely do with any other developer. This is a very common cultural phenomena in Mac culture, the "religion-ification of our relationship with Apple" which is the only reason I keep mentioning it. It's this very tendency by us which is the primary cause of the problems we're discussing.

It's not helpful or logical to keep the focus on what the users should do because then a million different OSX install problems have to be solved one by one by one without end. What we should be doing instead is aiming at the source of these problems, Apple. If Apple added prominent warnings to it's OSX installers 80% of such problems go away the next day.

I'm not rationalizing mediocrity. Apple, like Toyota, has been on the forefront with their efforts. But again, they are just machines, and machines need TLC, no matter who makes them.

Then why doesn't Apple make this very point in their OSX installers? Why don't they instruct users to "backup before you install!" just as you are wisely advising in many posts across the forum? All I'm suggesting is that Apple do what you do.

If that warning was prominently displayed in clear language at the start of the install process, and a user ignored the warning and then had a crisis, then I agree it's the user's fault.

Remember, Apple has spent decades deliberately building a user base dominated by average consumers who are not nerds. Think of your grandma who uses her Mac for email, and then she sees a button which suggests she should upgrade her system for free. Just click the button, it's easy, it just works etc. And then maybe she has a disaster, and then maybe she winds up here looking for help, and then we tell her it's all her fault.

This pattern has been repeated about a billion times on every Mac forum, and in case you haven't noticed :) I'm sick of it. Ha, ha, my posts should come with a warning label too. :)
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,846
Reaction score
241
Observe how you keep trying to shift the blame on to Mac users. Note your reluctance to blame Apple for Apple's failures, just as we would routinely do with any other developer. This is a very common cultural phenomena in Mac culture, the "religion-ification of our relationship with Apple" which is the only reason I keep mentioning it. It's this very tendency by us which is the primary cause of the problems we're discussing.

Macs are not the only devices where one needs to find out things on their own. In fact, it has been going on for quite some time. And that necessity for doing research on one's own is exactly the reason why folks that live in the "No problems Mac" dream world are just doing that: dreaming.

It's not helpful or logical to keep the focus on what the users should do because then a million different OSX install problems have to be solved one by one by one without end. What we should be doing instead is aiming at the source of these problems, Apple. If Apple added prominent warnings to it's OSX installers 80% of such problems go away the next day.

Then why doesn't Apple make this very point in their OSX installers? Why don't they instruct users to "backup before you install!" just as you are wisely advising in many posts across the forum? All I'm suggesting is that Apple do what you do.

If that warning was prominently displayed in clear language at the start of the install process, and a user ignored the warning and then had a crisis, then I agree it's the user's fault.

I actually do not remember if when Apple (and other manufacturers) was distributing the OS in boxed packages, such a warning was on the box. I suspect it was. But, given we are living in a digital world, obviously things have changed dramatically.

Heck, Toyota goes at great lengths to advertise how reliable a Corolla, Camry, Rav4, etc. are. But, any further need to do some simple maintenance on one's own is definitely not highlighted. One needs to take the initiative to do such things.

Another pertinent example: like most other homes, our place has a furnace, and their are filters inside of it. If one thinks a furnace is going to run on its own forever, again that is "dream world mentality", then dream on! That is not going to happen, plain and simple. One simple thing to do is to clean the filters that the furnace has. I know I do it.

Similarly with vacuum cleaners. It is always wise to frequently clean them, and in this case, the manual that comes with the machine will state that, along with written instructions. But, still a number of folks ignore it.

I could give many, many more examples, even cases where is so, so simple to do such maintenance.

Remember, Apple has spent decades deliberately building a user base dominated by average consumers who are not nerds. Think of your grandma who uses her Mac for email, and then she sees a button which suggests she should upgrade her system for free. Just click the button, it's easy, it just works etc. And then maybe she has a disaster, and then maybe she winds up here looking for help, and then we tell her it's all her fault.

I could easily say the same thing for numerous other mechanical devices (I've already pointed out a few of them). As is always the case, as things advance, some folks are "kind of" left behind. That has always been, and will always be, the case.

This pattern has been repeated about a billion times on every Mac forum, and in case you haven't noticed :) I'm sick of it. Ha, ha, my posts should come with a warning label too. :)

Conversely, this "dream world" belief has been exhibited a gazillion times for all sorts of devices, including Macs. I have seen, in numerous instances, where folks post about an issue, and expect miracles for it to be solved. Inside, I get a "sick of it" feeling", but then I feel sorry for the poster, and I try and help. I'm sure there are other folks here that feel the same way.

In any event, there is the "dream world" difference that, will most likely, continue to exist, whether it is for Macs, Toyotas, furnaces, vacuum cleaners, etc., etc.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
Well, ok, I respect your right to be a member of the Apple religion. :) Seriously, this is what I mean, the relentless attempts to deflect any challenge to Apple, as if Tim Cook were the Pope or something.

Honestly, I don't get why you are working so hard to deflect the suggestion that Apple give the very same wise advice to users that you yourself give in post after post after post. You are clearly experienced enough to understand that backups would solve a great many of these OSX issues.

All I'm demanding is a SINGLE SENTENCE at the front of the OSX installer.
And yet, I could post that idea on 50 different Mac forums, and the threads would all fill up to overflowing with just the kind of blame deflections you are attempting here.

Consider this. Imagine that it wasn't Apple we were talking about, but me (I'm a developer too). If my installers worked with the same reliability as Apple installers, Mac forum users would be ripping me a new one with great enthusiasm, right?

Yes, of course you're right, technology requires knowledge etc. What is so very scary about Apple being the one to provide that knowledge to it's users???
 

Cory Cooper

Moderator
Joined
May 19, 2004
Messages
11,106
Reaction score
496
Easy fellas...let's move on from this so it doesn't get out of hand. Everyone is entitled to their opinion and has the right to express it, but I don't want this to get further off topic. The original post was from May 23rd of this year, and Sannyboi hasn't returned since then for additional help.

Thanks,

C
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
Ok Cory, good idea, agreed. Sorry for what may be excessive enthusiasm.
 

Cory Cooper

Moderator
Joined
May 19, 2004
Messages
11,106
Reaction score
496
No worries...I can appreciate your enthusiasm very much. ;)

It's all good...just want it to stay that way.

C
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
To go even further off topic, I must admit that my Dad and I used to debate with great energy when I was young, and it was a bonding experience for us. I often try to replicate this enjoyable bonding experience with anonymous strangers on the net. There's a name for this medical problem I think. Oh yea, I remember now, nerd disease. And it's all Apple's fault!!!!! :)
 

Cory Cooper

Moderator
Joined
May 19, 2004
Messages
11,106
Reaction score
496
I hear ya...

I have been a strong Apple supporter (but not a fanboy) since the '80s, but I agree that the company is not the same since Steve passed. Having done Apple support personally and professionally since the early '90s, there are a lot of things that I don't agree with or think should change. But, there aren't many of them that I have control over, so I do what I can with the tools and knowledge I have acquired.

I am just happy that I chose this side of the fence, instead of the dark side...;)

C
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,846
Reaction score
241
No problemo, Cory (as Arnie says!). I also am glad to not be on the "dark side". I had to endure that during my working days, and when such days were over, I could not wait to get home to my Appel machine. As time went on, and technology advanced, I was able to use my Appel machines more and more for the various positions that I held.

And finally, to get more off topic, I have learned through the years that one cannot depend on "someone" else to always be there with required advice, assistance, etc. So to overcome that, I just took the initiative and attempted to learn things on my own. In most cases, that has been rewarding, productive, and a positive learning experience. And, like fine wine, as I got older, I got better and better at it. I'm just so glad that I do not aspire to live in a dream world and expecting others to always guide me.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
205
Reaction score
9
I have been a strong Apple supporter (but not a fanboy) since the '80s, but I agree that the company is not the same since Steve passed.

I see it like this.

Steve Jobs is to Apple what Jesus is to Christianity. Point being, his personality and talents, for the better and the worse, are stamped upon Apple to a remarkable degree. Like Steve, Apple is brilliant at marketing and design, not so interested in reliability, and often pretty big jerks too.

The other factor is that Apple has become a huge very successful multi-national corporation. As such, it exists to serve shareholders, not us.

Finally, just about anybody experiencing that level of success is going to have a very natural human tendency to become sloppy, careless, lazy and complacent, ie. Microsoft syndrome. This can happen to anybody.

Apple was born raging at the machine, the big powers who controlled computing back in the sixties and seventies. Now Apple is the machine. Thus, if we wish to be true to Apple's founding vision, we need to drop the Apple religion business, and rage against the new machine. If we pledge our blind allegiance to any power of this scale, that power will soon become the dark side, and we will be the mindless drone robots marching in lockstep obedience. And that my friends, is NOT "thinking differently".

BTW, does anyone know the link I should use to update my iBlowhard app?
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top