Old technology clashes with new technology.


Lufbrarunner

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My 1 year old TomTom Cardio/Runner watch bit the dust lat week and I decided That I did not need a replacement as I had an old Garmin 305, that I had used in the past, about18 months ago. I thought it would just be a matter of re-linking it to garmin connect, as I do with my garmin cycle device and as I had done in the past with the 305. No such luck, apparently when Apple brought out High Sierra the Garmin 305 was no longer compatible ( something to to with USB protocols) So I installed Yosemite on a spare SSD and found that this was to early to be compatible with garmin connect, not to be put off I used a disk image of El Capitan to upgrade the Yosemite drive, Success. At least I did not have to purchase a new watch.
Progress, who needs it :)
 
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honestone

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Yeah, sometimes it is best to stick with "older" stuff. Automobiles are a good example of that. Our 2005 Mercedes Benz CLK 320 still runs like a charm (my wife uses it way more than I do; I use our 2013 Toyota Camry), and it only has 68,000 miles on it. I keep wanting to get her a new car, but she is happy with the 320.
 

honestone

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Mercedes build cars to last.
So far (except for one bizarre issue), that seems to be the case. Of course, we take care of the car, especially from a maintenance perspective (and as I mentioned, we have only 68,000 miles on it). We used to have a 2001 BMW 525i (purchased new, like our Mercedes and Toyota), and for the first 60,000 miles, it was fine, and lived up to its billing as "The Ultimate Driving Machine". But after 60,000 miles, it became a nightmare to own. So many maintenance issues, it was frustrating, to say the least. When we finally got rid of it (traded it in for the Camry), it had about 98,000 miles on it, and it was due to have the Oxygen Sensor changed at 100,000 miles.

What has always been the case (and still is) is that German cars are built real well (strong), but are maintenance liabilities. Japanese cars, on the other hand, are not built as strong, but are much better regarding reliability and maintenance. We used to own a 1996 Camry XLE V6 (same model we have now), had it for 8 1/2 years, and it was the best car we have ever owned. Except for normal maintenance items (new battery around 40,000 miles, brakes around 40,000 miles, and new tires around 45,000 miles), it ran like a charm! Our current one is similar, although the brakes are lasting longer (have about 55,000 miles on it, and the original brakes are still good). Also, the V6 on our Camry is definitely more responsive than the V6 inside the Mercedes.
 
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Lufbrarunner

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Just had a rethink on this, I felt it was a waste of a 120gb SSD for just the OS and 1 app, so I now have the OS and app installed on a 32gb SD card,. As I only need it for about 5 minutes per day this should suffice., at least until I update my Garmin.
 

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