Apple "Pushing" High Sierra

Discussion in 'Mac OS X' started by honestone, Nov 19, 2017.

  1. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    This article actually appeared several days ago:

    https://tidbits.com/article/17633

    Myself, I have not seen any such "pushing" from Apple, as in the App Store Preference Pane on both of my Macs, the entry "Automatically check for updates" (and all the 4 sub choices under than one) are not checked.

    As it is, I would never do an update for any version of the Mac OS (even a "within the same" Mac OS) using that Preference Pane. I always do such upgrades/updates myself.
     
    honestone, Nov 19, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    I get 1-2 push notices from Apple each day about High Sierra. Thank you very much, Cap'n Tim, but I'll upgrade if or WHEN I'M READY!
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 6, 2017
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    I used to get them, but as I explained above, one can turn that off.
     
    honestone, Dec 6, 2017
    #3
  4. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    Most of my notifications are useful to me, so I don't want to turn them off.
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 6, 2017
    #4
  5. honestone

    Spawn_Dooley Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,735
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    van diemen's land
    I've made my executive decision to totally bypass 10.13 & will likely make the next upgrade from my 10.12 to 10.14, likely 10.14.3 or 10.14.4.

    This is just my personal preference at this moment in time based on my gut instincts regarding bleeding edge technologies.
     
    Spawn_Dooley, Dec 7, 2017
    #5
    Allen Davis likes this.
  6. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    My sentiments exactly right now. But that begs the question: with Cap'n Cook's proven incompetence, might it not be likely that the next OS after High Sierra might be worse? Apple continues stepping on its own feet at every turn it seems to me.
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 8, 2017
    #6
  7. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    Given that I am using SSDs entirely, I was hoping there would be a speed increase with using High Sierra (assuming one can avoid all its problems/issues). But in what I have seen posted both here and on Micromat's site, that is not the case, even with the new APFS file system. Similarly, with discussions with the developer of SuperDuper!, even formatting external SSDs as APFS offers no speed advantage.

    I guess if I was using Apple's apps (like Pages, Notes, Apple Mail, Spotlight, etc.), there could be a reason to upgrade. But I don't use any Apple apps (besides the Finder, of course), so that need to upgrade is not there.
     
    honestone, Dec 8, 2017
    #7
    Allen Davis likes this.
  8. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    I know this is a bit off-topic for this thread, but wanted to reply.

    I understand that you use SSDs entirely because you prize the speed these things afford, as do I. However, I’m a long, long way from giving up HHDs entirely, and I’d like to list my reasons.

    Price is among them. Cost per GB is much lower for HDDs and will remain so for the foreseeable future. I see 1TB HDDs for about $50 or less all the time. A Mercury Pro 6G SSD runs nearly $400.

    Long-term storage and archiving is another reason. It’s yet to be proven that SSDs can and will maintain its data over the long haul without a power source or at least being powered up from time-to-time. I learned of this from a tech guy at OWC, who referred me to a couple of white papers on the subject. This potential problem will likely be overcome at some point, but that doesn’t justify abandoning HDDs. At least not yet.

    Over the years, HHDs have become more robust and reliable as well. Though they don’t see much usage these days, I have two SCSI HDs in my old 8600/G3 that are now 20 years old, and the original 80GB HD in my PowerMac G4 is 15 years old.

    Speed? Not a problem, at least for me. I have two separate Quantum Snap! Servers I bought back in the early 1990s. And at the time, 20GB was considered insane. These devices contain two HDDs each and set up as a RAID 0. I swapped out the drives a few years ago for much higher capacity devices and they can now store 4TB each.

    RAID arrays are not only designed for safely storing data, but also for accessing their contents quickly. These little puppies are fast. And being based on SATA HDDs, they can keep their data safely for years if not decades (if stored properly, of course).

    The only drawback I can see with these storage devices is that TechTool Pro doesn’t support RAID arrays. I also have SpeedTools on my Macs, and I need to get around to finding out if it handles RAIDs. (Got it as a bundle from OWC but have never taken it out for a spin.)

    And on the topic of speed, I use a number of 2.5” and 3.5” SATA drives, both HDD and SSD in a NewerTech Voyager S3 dock. The dock itself is a USB 3.1, but I use it with my USB 2-based MacBook and iMac, and they aren’t all that slow. I will admit the SSDs are noticeably faster. Likewise, I have a couple of Mercury’s On-The-Go bus-powered housings with 1TB HDDs. One is USB 3.1 only, the other one has FireWire 800 and USB 3 ports which I use on the iMac because of its FireWire port.

    One caveat: I hate 5,400 rpm drives but do own one 500GB HDD, which I pulled out of my MacBook days after getting it to install a 1TB SSD and never another one for any reason because they are dog-dirt slow. The one I yanked out of my MacBook will gather dust until Rapture.

    The slowest storage devices I have are a number of 3.5” 500GB IDE drives, all in Rosewill USB 2 housings. I use a couple for the data on my G4 MDD, which I now rarely use, and a couple more are for my son’s backups. I got these housings new and dirt cheap a few years ago and couldn’t bear to let all my old hard drives go to waste.

    Thanks to reading many of your posts, and to the fact I serendipitously suffered a disastrous hard disk failure about the same time, I’ve become rabidly fanatical about backing up my backups. And then making backups of my backups! It isn’t paranoia to believe that catastrophe is stalking one when it is! And it’s never a matter of IF a HDD or SSD might fail. It is a matter of WHEN.

    TimeMachine is great and serves an important role, but I feel sorry for anyone who relies on that alone for safe data storage. Everyone should sit up on their hind legs and take your advice about backing up!
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 9, 2017
    #8
  9. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    Completely understand what you are saying. The "reasons" why I went to an all SSD setup are:

    1. My mid 2013 13" MacBook Air came with a 252 gig Samsung SSD inside of it, and it is a snappy machine (although I wish it had 8 gig of memory, instead of its stock 4 gig (cannot be upgraded)).

    2. My late 2012 Mac Mini came with a 1TB, 5400 rpm Hitachi internal drive. I actually did not need that much space, but that was fine. I used the machine for about 6 months, making sure to keep it "lean, mean, and clean". That included using Tech Tool Pro to defragment/optimize that drive. But, it was just not as responsive as I wanted. So, I installed a Samsung Pro 840 256 gig SSD inside it, and as expected, the speed increase and performance was dramatic! The Hitachi went inside a nice, slim Orico external case, with a USB connection. I still have it, but am not using it (see below as to why). I have actually been trying to sell it.

    3. I used to have a couple of HDD external drives, and using them with their Firewire 800 ports was OK with both of my Macs (the Mac Mini has a Firewire 800 port, but for the MacBook Air, I had to purchase an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter). However, one of the drives started to fail, and through my nephew, I was able to purchase 2 Samsung 850 Pro 512 gig SSDs at a super price! Each of them went inside slim Orico devices, and they work like a charm! I even take one of them with us whenever we travel. I had to eventually thrash the failing external drives, and I was able to sell the other one.

    4. I don't use either of my Macs that "intensely" (I'm retired). In fact, I rarely run more than one program at a time. My usage is mainly checking EMail and surfing the internet. Occasionally I download "stuff", and also sometimes use Word (and less frequently Excel). And I use Quicken 2017 for having another "copy" of our checkbook. When we do travel, I use my MacBook Air to watch videos (movies and TV series) via one of the external Samsung SSDs. So, I am not too concerned at this point about any "possible" degradation of my external SSDs without its own power source. Most of the time, those two devices are used for my SuperDuper! backups.

    4. And yes, you are spot on about backups! So many folks come here for assistance with an issue, and they do not have a backup. Since my processing is rather light, and also because I am diligent about keeping my Macs "lean, mean, and clean", SuperDuper! easily satisfies my need to backups, and I only need to do it once a week (in fact, in a little while, I will perform my weekly disk cleanup/maintenance/repair tasks, and back ups, using Onyx, Tech Tool Pro, and SuperDuper!). There have been a couple of times where I did need to restore from my SuperDuper! backups, and before I started that process, I first saved off 1) any software updates I had downloaded, 2) all my EMails, and 3) my Quicken Transaction files. And when that has happened recently, I would boot the respective Mac from the most recent (usually 2 or 3 days earlier) SuperDuper! backup, used Disk Utility there to Erase and Format the internal drive (SSD), did a clean, fresh, virgin installation of the Mac OS the machine was using (I always have the applicable "Install macOS whatever" file available, use Migration Assistant to "migrate"/copy needed stuff from the backup, and finally, after restarting the machine, "get" all the items I mentioned above that I had saved off back onto the machine.

    In any event, I also am pleased to read your posts/comments. They are definitely informative!
     
    honestone, Dec 9, 2017
    #9
    Allen Davis likes this.
  10. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    Thanks for your kind words.

    I, too, am retired, but I find myself gravitating back to the kind of work I’ve done for the last 25 years for more and more projects, but mostly as a consultant.

    I clung to my G4 MDD for so long and so hard because I refused to pay Adobe to rent their software, and the PPC versions of Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign (and even Pagemaker) suited me well, as did Acrobat Pro v.6.

    Then I finally let my baby sister talk me into giving eBay a spin, and boy, did I get hooked once I was convinced PayPal was reasonably secure.

    I purchased Adobe Creative Suite 4 for about $140. Alas, it was an upgrade version which I couldn’t install, and the seller basically told me it was my problem. My response to her (and to eBay) was less than kind. Actually it was worse… I swallowed hard and took another dip in the water, this time insisting potential sellers find out for sure if what they were selling was a true “full version” or an upgrade. Sure enough, bought CS3 this time (for $70), hoping to use it as a stepping-stone to get CS4 installed, and damned if IT wasn’t an upgrade too! However, this seller didn’t learn of his error until after he’d shipped to me. But he was Johnny-on-the-spot and sent me a link to Adobe, no less, which provided me a substitute serial number. And they didn’t charge me a dime for it! I had been living those few days in mournful dread that Adobe would want to charge me an arm-and-a-leg, 9 pints of blood and the naming rights for all future grandchildren for a new license!

    Another nice thing this seller did was also ship me a copy of Creative Suite Production Premium at his expense! So now I’ve got all the software I needed for “work” plus some insanely great video editing, animation and web production software! (Adobe is still trying to con me into subscribing to their Creative Cloud stuff, but I ain’t gonna do it. I want my software on discs in my possession that are mine and only pay for once.)

    All that said, I almost never boot up the old G4 except to play Apeiron (a game like the old ’80s game “Centipede”).

    I’ve not owned my iMac long enough to get really sentimentally attached like I did with the G4. Now I’m wanting to sell it because, being a mid-2008, it’ll only take 6GB RAM and won’t run Sierra. (I bought it in a pinch for $350 in 2015 when my G4 was awaiting me to transplant its power supply. Then again, I’ve got grandkids who might like it. I do want a newer iMac, but insist it still have an optical drive, but will forego one if I must.

    My MacBook is a mid-2010, and has become my all-time favorite computer. 16GB RAM and a Mercury 1TB SSD, crazy-great optical drive, this little monster boots Sierra in 25 seconds and can run Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat, Distiller, Safari and Mail with nary a hint of slowing down. I intend to buy another one early next year and mothball it for the day this one gives up the ghost. Heck, maybe two since really nice ones can be purchased cheap! Another nice thing is I have a very nice 30” monitor I can hook it up to.

    The only thing I’m not crazy about is having a Trackpad. Never liked them, so I bought an Apple Magic Mouse (the kind that uses 2 AA batteries; I’d never dream of the USB-chargeable one. I do use the Trackpad, but only for its more esoteric features. And it’s a pity it doesn’t have USB 3.

    My son thinks I’m nuts for having so much storage, even after explaining why. His reply was amusing. “Okay, Dad. Now you can download the entire Internet. What are you gonna do with it???” Kids can say the darndest things as Art Linkletter used to say. Even kids who are 38 years old!
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 9, 2017
    #10
  11. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    Your posts are always interesting! Sorry for all your eBay "hassles". I have never purchased anything from eBay, although our youngest son has been happy with it. Still, I am somewhat leery.

    I also despise Trackpads, and even though I have owned at least 4 or 5 Mac laptops, I still use a mouse (and of course with myMac Mini, I have to use one). I used to use Kensington mice, but for the last 5 years or so, I have been happy with Logitech ones (I did get recent, definitive clarification from Logitech that both of my current ones work with High Sierra, which will be comforting). All of my mice have always needed batteries.

    I have "slightly" thought about going back to "work" as a COBOL consultant, working exclusively from home. But since June 2011, when I permanently retired, I just enjoy my freedom. Both my wife and I both keep busy, and especially for the months late March through early October, I/we do a lot of outdoor "stuff". As it is, I just hate to be inside when the weather is nice, and thus having to work would cut into that. At this point, that is just not acceptable.

    When I "initially" retired in 2006, I actually continued working, teaching Mathematics courses part-time at some community colleges. For the first few years, it was fun. But as time went on, students became more and more "demanding" in terms of what they felt they were entitled to. That usually meant that they wanted to get by with as little work as possible, but that was/is not going to happen, especially with Mathematics courses. The good thing about teaching part-time is that I was able to get onto the state';s benefit package, and it was very, very inexpensive (the premiums, as expected, did continue to rise, and I don't know what they are now). But I just got more and more dismayed with a lot of the students, and I thought to myself, "This is our future generation?". There were a few good ones, but even that number decreased as time went on. So, at the end of the Spring Quarter 2011, I was not "invited" back to teach, but I never regret that. I have been happily, permanently retired since June 2011.

    So far, my Mac Mini works very, very well for me, and just last week, I upgraded the Ram to 8 Gig. My MacBook Air is "OK", but as I stated, I wish it had 8 gig of Ram. I have recently thought about getting the newest (June 2017) model (with a 252 gig SSD, of course), but I keep seeing all these reports about how great the MacBook Pros are, and especially the Retina displays. I actually have never "experienced" using Retina displays, and I wonder how much better they are. As it is, I have an 11 year old Sony 19" monitor that I use with my Mac Mini, an dit is fine (solid Sony product, just like most of the stuff they make). On both my Mac Mini and the Sony 19" monitor, the colors are fine, so I am unsure what I am "missing" by not having a Retina display.

    It's fun and interesting to exchange posts with you. I hope other folks don't mind.
     
    honestone, Dec 9, 2017
    #11
  12. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    I appreciate the kudos! I’ve learned quite a bit from reading your posts and enjoy reading them. Despite the initial problems I had with my first eBay purchases, I’m happy doing business with them and also like having a PayPal account. I’ve done 90% of my Christmas shopping there, and for the first time in my life, I completed ALL my holiday shopping before December 1! Up until last year, I was still shopping on Christmas Eve! This season has been the most stress-free I can ever remember, at least as an adult!

    I really love being outdoors during nice weather, and one of my favorite pastimes is to go to my gun club for plinking, target shooting and especially to test my handloaded ammo with my Cronny Gamma Model chronograph and MacBook loaded with a really neat ballistics program, even though I have to boot the Mac in Linux to use it.

    As I said previously, just doing a little part-time dabbling and consulting is okay, but I’m surprised that I’m doing as much IT work as I am for a few businesses. Their “IT” people seem to be of the “shake-n-bake” variety who are woefully under-qualified for their jobs.

    I completely understand your frustration during your teaching days. How could many of your students not realize that there can’t be shortcuts, etc., in a math course??? Or that mathematics is a very demanding discipline? (I recently watched a documentary on John Nash, the renowned math professor who pioneered game theory and who developed what later became known as The Nash Equilibria which dramatically affected the field of economics. It can be found on YouTube, and I highly recommend you look it up. The Russell Crowe movie “A Beautiful Mind” was loosely based on Nash’s life.)

    I taught American History, Government, Civics, “Current Affairs” and Economics at a private high school for a few years but soon discovered that teaching more like a college professor than a high school babysitter was daunting. I eschewed text books as much as possible, telling my students they could read them if they liked, just as long as they did it on their own time. I stressed they needed to listen closely to what I said in class, and to hone their note-taking skills. I also emphasized the importance of anything I’d write on the white board. The school in which I taught was/is a very prestigious one and is difficult to gain admission. Even so, I had a number of lazy students and even disrespectful ones. I had to escort two boys to the Dean’s office one day for disruptive behavior. On the way, one of the students stopped, turned to me and asked, “Do you know who my father is?” “Sure,” I said. “He’s Vice Regent on the Board. So what? I’d suggest you write a letter to your Congressman since I’m confident your father will be of no assistance to you here. And I’m certain I’ll still have my job after you give him whatever sob story you dish up for him.” And I did. heheheheh

    I quit teaching somewhat out of frustration, but more so because I had an opportunity to engage in a career which I profoundly enjoyed and allowed for endless creativity.

    I’m re-thinking what I wrote earlier about mothballing a couple of mid-2010 MacBooks in case disaster befalls this one. I’ve been eyeballing the 2012 MacBook Pro offerings on OWC’s website and believe I’d rather go that route. The most interesting ones already have 16GB RAM and either 1.0TB HDDs or 500GB SSDs and sport USB 3, Thunderbolt and a couple which also have a FireWire 800 port.

    I believe that since Steve Jobs’ death in 2011, Jonny Ives has been completely out of control with Apple’s laptop designs. He’s eliminated optical drives altogether as well as reducing the number of ports to one, all in his insane desire to see how light and thin he can make a laptop. (Hey, Jonny! Ever hear of the point of diminishing returns???) With the newer laptop offerings, he’s forcing users to buy all manner of docks, adapters or whatever just so they can have more than a single peripheral attached at a time. Likewise, he’s made it impossible to upgrade anything, or even change the battery. He (and Apple in general) are on a mad quest to force their users onto the Cloud. And I resent that deeply and will resist storing anything but a bare, bare minimum of anything there. I don’t give a d**n how secure they claim their servers to be. I often think Ives is trying to revive Jobs’ old hostility to users’ ability to do any “tinkering” around in the guts of their machines as was the case with the original Mac 128 and 512K models in 1984.

    I, for one, don’t want to buy a custom Mac at point-of-purchase, like specifying RAM and storage. Sure, 16GB of RAM is nice. So is a 500GB HDD/SSD. But to buy Macs like that is far more expensive than buying an “off-the-shelf” model and upgrading the innards later. And if the history of computing holds true, then such a configuration will highly likely be inadequate in just 2-3 years. Then you’re stuck with the only option being the purchase of another new laptop. To me, this is planned obsolescence gone amok. Perfidious, pernicious, insidious and a few other adjectives come to mind, along with a few more “colorful” descriptives and derogatory questions about their family lineage which I don’t want to post.

    And when it comes to buying a newer iMac next year, I intend to find one which still has an optical drive, USB 3, FireWire 800 and Thunderbolt and will address at least 32GB (hopefully 64GB) RAM.

    I’ve seen a number of Retina Macs, and they are very impressive indeed.

    I ran TechTool Pro on my 1TB external OTG drive last evening and it kept telling me the Optimize Files was “incomplete,” that it only optimized 37 of 39 files.

    Out of curiosity, I launched Intech SpeedTools and defragged the drive in just a couple of moments. I ran ST’s full suite of diagnostics and one thing that struck me was how fast it seemed to be. Gave me pause, thinking the next time I perform these tasks, I’ll simply forego TTP and use ST instead to see if it is faster.

    Another issue I’ve had with TTP is that in checking file integrity, it lists hundreds of files with messages like “Invalid image file” or encountered an “unexpected character P at line 1.” All of these files, so far are fine and none have been “invalid image files” since Photoshop, Contenta and GraphicConverter all open them fine. I contacted Micromat about this and they told me to simply ignore it. In fact, the Micromat tech I spoke with seemed to take deep umbrage at my referring to this aberrance as a “bug” or a “glitch.” Not very comforting. I thought about asking him if this was some form of “undocumented feature,” which is what Bill Gates called them when Windows proved to be defective in some manner (Remember when early Pentium PCs couldn't reliable do long division?). I thought it was a bit disturbing to hear this from an Intech pro, which is why I took SpeedTools out for that test drive I referred to in an earlier post.

    Another thing to note is that I have SpeedTools 3.9.3 OEM. Some features aren’t available until you buy the “full version” for $39.99, but are charged later for upgrades (bummer). Or you can buy the “Lifetime Upgrade” version for $79.99 (sucks).

    The included documentation is excellent and only a few big features are disabled in the OEM version. It’s still quite usable, but having a Full Version would be nice. I’ll hold off getting that for now, and if I do, I’ll just go ahead and get the unlimited upgrade.

    I also enjoy our exchanges. I suppose the moderators could either tell us to knock it off and “get a room” (just couldn’t resist, so forgive my jest), or if other forum members don’t like it, they don’t have to read them.

    That being said, the moderators here are extremely knowledgeable and are enjoyable to read when they post. Without any conceit, it might be beneficial for others to read our exchanges. While we have different approaches in some things, we share a great deal in common. And it’s possible we may write a thing or three that might actually prove helpful to someone.
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 11, 2017 at 4:13 PM
    #12
  13. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    Your post is super! Lots of interesting facts.

    So far, I have not encountered any of the issues with Tech Tool Pro like you have had, and that goes all the way back to when I first started using it ("In a galaxy far far away"). As it is, some of the tasks in Tech Tool Pro are no longer applicable for SSDs.

    Regarding teaching, I always faced at least two challenges when teaching a Mathematics course: 1) Most of the students did not want to be there. 2) Some students had a "fear" of Math, and doubted their own capabilities. I always tried to overcome those by always handing back exams and homework the class after an exam was taken/homework was handed in. I would also go over the entire exam, and also worked out some "common" homework problems I saw after grading them. Also, I allowed the students to earn extra credit, which could be used to boost their grade. And for hard working and deserving students, I would also, at times, "fudge" their final grade upward somewhat. Finally, I definitely encouraged questions. I even held office hours (definitely unusual for a part-time instructor). But even with all that, still had some lazy/"felt entitled"/disrespectful students. The stories I could relay would blow you away! The one glaring one, though, is that every Spring Quarter, I taught the two courses Elementary Algebra, and Business Calculus (ie, Calculus for business majors). Ironically, for the most part, the students in the Elementary Algebra class (most of them were young, and fresh out of high school) were more dedicated and mature than some of the ones in the Business Calculus class. Also, that Business Calculus class was taken by students who were business majors, and were graduating that June (and transferring to a 4 year school to complete their bachelor degree).

    My exercise regimen from October through the latter part of March is swimming at a local LA Fitness, along with taking occasional 2 hour walks with my wife (when it's not too cold). That works out well. But, when the latter part of March rolls around (and of course we have already "spring forward"), I start going more and more outside. From the latter part of March through mid June or so, I am picking a fern that Koreans just love (my wife is Korean). It is actually quite expensive in the local Korean stores. I really enjoy doing that, as I am out in the fresh air, and when I go alone, no one bothers me. I am typically gone for 4 to 5 hours. For some of places, my wife (and sometimes her sister) comes with me. It is definitely good exercise, along of course with getting the fresh ferns. Besides being a side dish, my wife (and again sometimes with help from her sister) makes an excellent soup that does wonders when I have a cold (or just eating as a meal).

    Once that picking "season" ends, I take more and more walks with my wife. We used to go hiking, but have not done so in about 2 years. Maybe I can try and get her to start again this coming spring/summer. I also always do 3 summer projects around our place: wash the aluminum siding, wash the garage door, and shampoo our carpets. Again, very good exercise. Then, "picking" season starts again the latter part of July, initially with blackberries. Right around Labor Day, I switch to picking green grapes, and getting plums. Getting the plums is a short window, but I can pick grapes though just about all of September and into October. Then, towards the latter part of October, we get chestnuts. My wife makes excellent wine from the blackberries, and from the grapes (they are definitely sweet, and thus I'll eat some of them fresh). And the chestnuts are WAY better than what they sell at the grocery store.

    I understand what you mean about the constant "struggle" of purchasing Macs. I actually "pulled" the DVD drive mechanism out of my old Pac Pro and installed it inside an external enclosure. It is sitting right here near my Mac Mini, but I have not used it recently. No need to, as everything is delivered "digitally". But there are times I want to make a CD with music on it, so that we can listen it to it while driving.

    OK, that should be enough of some of my "history". So glad we are having these "talks".
     
    honestone, Dec 11, 2017 at 6:49 PM
    #13
  14. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    You caused me to sneeze Coca-Cola through my nostrils with a couple of lines from your last missive. While I normally read at a normal, leisurely pace, I am a pretty good speed reader, and that’s what I was doing when I saw your post. I was in a hurry because I was expecting one of my grandsons to deliver a few things I needed and was zipping along at a fast clip (intending to go back and re-read your post more thoroughly), when I came across…

    “…my wife (and sometimes her sister) comes with me. It is definitely good exercise, along of course with getting the fresh ferns. Besides being a side dish, my wife (and again sometimes with help from her sister)…

    I thought, “what the???” at the same time I was sipping my Coke, which ended up spraying my desk and my MacBook. Thank God I bought that clear plastic keyboard protector a few weeks ago. I then proceeded to laugh my a** off! My brain was processing something I knew couldn’t be right.

    I love it when I encounter something that comes across differently than what was intended or if I perceive it incorrectly, the latter definitely being the case in this instance! Coincidentally, I just heard a commercial on the TV I keep on in my den for background noise, in which the narrator admonishes the audience not to “take this medication if you have (symptom, symptom, symptom, ad nauseam) or have flu-like symptoms or sores.” The copywriter should have more carefully crafted his wording, because I was unaware that the flu involved getting sores.

    None of my little episode is your fault. It was simply me misreading and/or skimming over certain words which didn’t quite register as I was scanning.

    I’ve let more than a few things escape my mouth and my keyboard over the years that should’ve been handled differently. Sometimes I’ve embarrassed myself, sometimes its been amusing.

    About winemaking. I’ve always found that to be a fascinating hobby. My Dad has a vineyard in which he grows grapes and blackberries. He makes his wine so sweet it makes Mogen David seem absolutely dry! And he insists on adding sugar, which invariably results in a wine with an alcohol content approaching 14%! He doesn’t drink very much of it. Most of it is used by my Mom in cooking. Dad calls his blackberry wine “super-charged monkey blood,” monkey blood being his lifelong name for Kool-Aid. He also refers to eggs as “cackle berries.” He’s a character even though his sense of humor is even more warped than mine. I suppose that’s where I got mine from!

    Have a few things to attend to, but I’ll definitely re-read your post yet again and reply to the more pertinent passages.
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 11, 2017 at 11:01 PM
    #14
  15. honestone

    honestone VIP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    3,322
    Likes Received:
    146
    Location:
    Kent, WA (just south of Seattle, WA)
    Definitely funny, about your interpretation of "For some of places, my wife (and sometimes her sister) comes with me". Part of that, of course, is my fault, as the first part needs to read "For some of the places". But even with that, your "interpretation" is funny!

    Regarding wine making, my wife also adds sugar, and sometimes she adds Vodka, sometimes not. Unfortunately, my wife is Type 2 diabetic, so she cannot drink it. Hence, as she says, "it all goes into your stomach". Picking all this fresh stuff, along with how careful my wife is with the meals she prepares, definitely goes a long way to keeping us healthy. We have visited vineyards in France and Italy, but my wife's wine is definitely better!
     
    honestone, Dec 12, 2017 at 12:17 AM
    #15
  16. honestone

    Allen Davis New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southwest of Indianapolis
    On my first scan, I simply thought you were referring to your wife as a "dish," just as I refer to my own wife. But I thought I'd missed something, backed up and resumed the speed-read thing, and that's when the Coke shot out of my nose! I still misread it!
     
    Allen Davis, Dec 12, 2017 at 2:26 AM
    #16
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.