Finding applications


Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
Some of the notifications I get for applications that need to be upgraded to 64-bit are applications that are unfamiliar to me, and which I can't find in my applications folder.

I also can see a bunch of unfamiliar applications looking in About This Mac/System Report/Software/Applications.

And when I decide to open an .mp3 file, I see options to open Quicktime Player, Quicktime Player 7, and Quicktime Player - Microsoft Windows XP.app (VMware Fusion 8.5.6). — I haven't had Fusion on my iMac for over a year.

Where are those other applications? Why does my iMac think I have applications on Windows which I don't have? How do I find out about all of those unknown applications to know whether I can or should safely remove them?
 
Ad

Advertisements

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
When you have upgraded the Mac OS, have you done upgrades "in place", ie, basically just let the new OS overwrite the older one? If that's the case, then there would be applications that are not "replaced" by the new OS which remain on your machine.

If you did any kind of restore from your backup, that could be another reason why you are seeing that VMware Fusion app.

Also, each new version of the Mac OS installs some newer Apple programs (along of course with "replacing" prior versions of other Apple programs, like Quicktime Player, Preview, Text Edit, etc.). I have never used Garage Band, but it is on both of my machines. You do need to be careful when removing "core" applications, like Apple Mail, Safari, etc. Those are also two which I do not use, but they are on both of my Macs.

If you want to completely get rid of an application, there is an excellent program called AppCleaner, available from here:

https://freemacsoft.net/appcleaner/

Make sure you get the correct version for the Mac OS you are running. It does an excellent job of finding most (if not all) files, folders, etc. associated with an application you want to remove (along of course with the application itself). When that is done, there could still be a few files remaining that are associated with that application. You can do a search for those remaining files, using the app's name. Spotlight is OK (again, another app I do not use), but I prefer another excellent free program called EasyFind, available from here:

https://www.devontechnologies.com/products/freeware.html

It is less of a resource hog than Spotlight is, and does as good a job (maybe better) at finding things.

Again, though, be careful about removing "core" applications. It would be good if there was a list of such applications.
 
Last edited:

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
I have phantom applications that I can't drop in an app cleaner, because they don't really exist. OSX *thinks* they exist, and they show up when finder gives options to apps to open files. And other applications *may* exist somewhere and Mac warns me about them – but I can't find them to be able to delete them if I choose!
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
First, I'lll again ask the question: how did you upgrade to the version of the Mac OS that you are now using? And what version is it?

Secondly, how dd you try to find such applications? With EasyFind, you should just be able to put the application name in the Search "area", and it will find all files that have that search "name" as part of its name. Some examples you could try (from your original post):

Quicktime Player - Microsoft
VMware

By the way, if you removed VMware Fusion, how did you do that?

Third, I have been recommending Onyx forever, and from the link that Lufbarunner provided, I am of course pleased that it is included as one of the ways to rebuild the Launch Services database. Here is a link where you can get Onyx:

https://www.titanium-software.fr/en/onyx.html

Make sure you get the correct version that corresponds to the version of the Mac OS you are running.

I am using the latest version of Mojave, OS 10.14.3, on both of my Macs, and thus I am using V3.5.7 of Onyx. When I click on that Maintenance tab, here is what I get:

Note that the rebuilding of the Launch Services database is already checked, under "Rebuilding". I also do not uncheck anything else, and simply click on "Run tasks". I run Onyx once a week as part of my disk cleanup/maintenance/repair tasks (along with Tech Tool Pro), and I would not be without it!
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
>First, I'lll again ask the question: how did you upgrade to the version of the Mac OS that you are now using? And >what version is it?

I always let my Mac upgrade itself. I'm using 10.14.3

> Secondly, how dd you try to find such applications? With EasyFind, you should just be able to put the application > name in the Search "area", and it will find all files that have that search "name" as part of its name. Some
> examples you could try (from your original post):

I used a program called "Find Any File", after I couldn't find it in Spotlight and by looking in applications. I don't remember the name of the program that I didn't recognize.

> Quicktime Player - Microsoft
> VMware

Running the recommended cleaner got rid of that option.

> By the way, if you removed VMware Fusion, how did you do that?

Probably used "trash me", but maybe I just deleted it.

> Third, I have been recommending Onyx forever, and from the link that Lufbarunner provided, I am of course > pleased that it is included as one of the ways to rebuild the Launch Services database. Here is a link where you > can get Onyx:

> https://www.titanium-software.fr/en/onyx.html

> Make sure you get the correct version that corresponds to the version of the Mac OS you are running.

I'm going to babysit 2 new nieces for a week starting today and won't get back to my computer.
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
How long has it been since you did a clean installation of a Mac OS? There comes a point where "just letting the machine upgrade itself" starts to cause issues.

Additionally, how do insure third party programs (ie, non-Apple) compatibility with each new Mac OS?

It looks like "Find Any File" is a decent program, but EasyFind is free.

Also, what do you mean by "Running the recommended cleaner got rid of that option."? That does not make much sense at all.

And using something like "Trash Me" (there is similar one called "Trash It!") does not delete all the files/folders, etc. associated with an application one is removing.

Finally, you really need to follow through and get Onyx. An excellent product.

But, if you don't want to do anything, what can one say?
 

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
> How long has it been since you did a clean installation of a Mac OS?

My iMac is late 2013, so I guess if "clean installation" means restoring from Time Machine on a new machine, that's when I last did it.

> There comes a point where "just letting the machine upgrade itself" starts to cause issues.

If "clean installation" means restoring from Time Machine, I could try formatting my Mac when I get back from my brothers in a week. I'll look it up to see what kind of risks are involved.

> It looks like "Find Any File" is a decent program, but EasyFind is free.
I've got both.

> Also, what do you mean by "Running the recommended cleaner got rid of that option."?

The one you recommended, "AppCleaner".

>That does not make much sense at all.

Sorry.

> And using something like "Trash Me" (there is similar one called "Trash It!") does not delete all the files/folders, > etc. associated with an application one is removing.

I knew that deleting it using the finder didn't do that. And Apple doesn't clean up (Now that I can no longer put my iPad and iPhone apps in iTunes, the apps I used to have there are still on my iMac.)

> Finally, you really need to follow through and get Onyx. An excellent product.

I'll look at that when I get back.

> But, if you don't want to do anything, what can one say?

If I didn't want to do anything, I wouldn't be asking for advice on what to do.
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
> How long has it been since you did a clean installation of a Mac OS?

My iMac is late 2013, so I guess if "clean installation" means restoring from Time Machine on a new machine, that's when I last did it.
That's 6 years ago! There have been at least 4 or 5 versions of the Mac OS since then. Sounds like you are asking for trouble.

> There comes a point where "just letting the machine upgrade itself" starts to cause issues.

If "clean installation" means restoring from Time Machine, I could try formatting my Mac when I get back from my brothers in a week. I'll look it up to see what kind of risks are involved.
Most likely, there could be "problematic" items on your backups, especially if you do little (if any) disk cleanup/maintenance/repairs.

> It looks like "Find Any File" is a decent program, but EasyFind is free.
I've got both.
I've had many successes with EasyFind.

> Also, what do you mean by "Running the recommended cleaner got rid of that option."?

The one you recommended, "AppCleaner".
There have been numerous times where I initially used AppCleaner for removing an application (and all the "pieces" AppCleaner finds), and then I use EasyFind and find some more "pieces" that I can remove.

> And using something like "Trash Me" (there is similar one called "Trash It!") does not delete all the files/folders, > etc. associated with an application one is removing.

I knew that deleting it using the finder didn't do that. And Apple doesn't clean up (Now that I can no longer put my iPad and iPhone apps in iTunes, the apps I used to have there are still on my iMac.)
That's exactly why it is wise to use AppCleaner and EasyFind.

> Finally, you really need to follow through and get Onyx. An excellent product.

I'll look at that when I get back.
That would be a wise move. Also, you would be smart to use Onyx as one of the tools for disk cleanup/maintenance/repairs.

> But, if you don't want to do anything, what can one say?

If I didn't want to do anything, I wouldn't be asking for advice on what to do.
But you have an odd way of showing any kind of appreciation when assistance is given. And this is not the first time. It can take a lot of time and effort to provide accurate, detailed assistance.
 
Last edited:

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
I really do appreciate the help. I know I'm not an effective communicator, but I do re-read my posts and edit them, hoping to improve on it. I'm better in fields where I know more, but nobody has questions about COBOL!!!!!
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
I really do appreciate the help. I know I'm not an effective communicator, but I do re-read my posts and edit them, hoping to improve on it. I'm better in fields where I know more, but nobody has questions about COBOL!!!!!
Hey, I used to be a COBOL programmer, and I definitely took advantage of the "Year 2000 Crisis" (from a financial perspective).

However, I can still communicate my appreciation in an effective manner.
 

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
Good times for Cobol programmers!! In a few minutes I will be shutting down my iMac for a week as I go to Las Vegas to take care of some new-born nieces (my brother is learning how to be a father - he will have his 62nd birthday while we are there!)
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
Good times for Cobol programmers!! In a few minutes I will be shutting down my iMac for a week as I go to Las Vegas to take care of some new-born nieces (my brother is learning how to be a father - he will have his 62nd birthday while we are there!)
Maybe try and win some money?
 

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
A further issue will come when Mojave is replaced — Do I keep my 32 bit applications that won't run, hoping for upgrades?
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
First, if you plan to upgrade to the next Mac OS, your current 32 bit applications will no longer work. Hence, you'll need to either upgrade them (assuming upgrades are available), or find a 64 bit replacement program. Myself, I have 2 such 32 bit applications that will not work when I upgrade: Quicken 2007, and Magic Number Machine (a calculator). I really like Quicken 2007 (it reminds me of reliable old COBOL software!), but I also have Quicken 2017, which is 64 bit. Have not found a suitable replacement yet for Magic Number Machine.

Secondly, your concerns about "problematic "stuff" on your Time Machine backups is a valid one. If you were (after "cleansing" your current setup) to use another backup program like SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner, either of them will capture EVERYTHING on your current system. But if you have anything on your Time Machine backups that are no longer on your Mac, and you absolutely need any of that, well, that's a more complicated issue. So, the question is whether or not any of your Time Machine backups contain anything that is not on your current machine that you absolutely need? Only you, of course, can answer that.

Assuming there is nothing "additional" on any of your Time Machine backups that you need, there are definitely some strategies you can pursue. I know I am going to repeat myself here (as other folks will note also), but the issue you raise is just one of the reasons why I continually state that I keep my Macs "lean, mean, and clean", and I make a concentrated effort to do that on a continuing basis. The analogy I use with automobiles is again relevant here. One of the automobiles we own is a Toyota Camry (actually the second one we have owned). It is certainly one of the most reliable cars in the world (as are most Toyota and Honda models), but it is still necessary to take care of it. I myself do some simpler maintenance on it (along with our other vehicle), and of course I take it in for regular, scheduled maintenance. Well, Macs are no different. Unfortunately, the majority of folks neglect to do that (just like the majority of folks neglect to take care of their automobiles).

In any event, given that you have a backup already (which is good), here is one approach:
  1. You will need to use some of your own efforts (explained below).
  2. Gather up all the software you will need. You already have 2 excellent products in Onyx and AppCleaner. It would be best if you invest in a more robust disk cleanup/maintenance/repair program to work in conjunction with Onyx. Given that you use Mojave, the "best" one is Tech Tool Pro (I use it, along with Onyx and SuperDuper!), It costs $100, but sometimes it is on sale for as low as $40 (typically in the fall).
  3. You'll need to obtain either SuperDuper! (SD) or Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC), and the latest version of the full installation file for Mojave. Besides price, the main difference between SD and CCC is that one can also backup the (hidden) Recovery HD partition with CCC. For me, though, that is not a detriment, as 1) that partition gets re-created with a new installation of the Mac OS, and 2) one can install it anyway.
Let me know if you want to pursue this, and I'll provide a more detailed, step-by-step plan. Two things you can do right away are 1) permanently remove deleted EMails with your EMail program, and 2) whenever you download a newer version of a program, get rid of the prior version (assuming you keep it around). That saves disk space, along with making things less cluttered. Also, an obvious place to look for "unneeded" files is your Downloads folder.
 
Last edited:

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
Why do I need SuperDuper! (SD) or Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC)? I guess I would also need another backup drive if I was going that way. That's not currently in my budget, but planning it for when Mojave is replaced makes sense, if I have the ability to keep my last backup for a year, while pulling out application by application. (After pulling out all of my security stuff first). Is there any application that cleans up the iTunes library? (iTunes is the buggiest program I've ever had to use)
 

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
The reason why I recommended either SuperDuper! (SD) or Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) is because you stated above "It noted that reinstalling apps using Time Machine might reinstall problems". Either SD or CCC create a bootable, backup/clone of your system, and it definitely makes restoring a breeze, and is certainly very, very helpful when doing a clean, fresh installation of the Mac OS.

Additionally, it makes no difference when you start using either SD or CCC for making backups.

But apparently you are not interested in doing that.
 

Howard Brazee

New Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
214
Reaction score
0
I like you assisting me, but do you have to keep insulting me?

I am ignorant enough that your last reply didn't seem to address my questions so that I understood. It appears that I need to buy another backup disk along with that backup program, correct? And I wanted to know if it will allow me to add applications backed up some time in the future. I have to budget my purchases, so I have time to prepare as long as I know whether I won't lose applications.

Thank-you for your help.
 
Ad

Advertisements

honestone

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
4,855
Reaction score
237
The problem is you have a "bizarre" way of showing any appreciation. You also don't always answer all the questions I ask. They are relevant.

In any event, here are some more questions that you need to answer:

1. How often are you backing up now? And are you doing incremental backups? If you are doing incremental backups, what are the reasons you do them? Myself, I just backup everything for each of my Macs once a week, with the new backup just replacing the prior one. But I understand that other folks use different strategies.

2. With your current backup/backups, is there anything you need on them that is not on your current machine? If you don't, then you should be able to use your current external drive "as is", with either SD or CCC. But if you do need any of that information, and it is not on your current system, then yes, you will need to purchase another drive (assuming your current one is "too small").

3. You need to clearly explain what you mean by your statement "while pulling out application by application. (After pulling out all of my security stuff first)".

4. Also, you need to explain "And I wanted to know if it will allow me to add applications backed up some time in the future". With either SD or CCC, you can do incremental backups also.

5. My iTunes library is not very large, and thus I don't have the complexities that you have. Hence, I don't know anything about cleaning up that library.

6. What disk cleanup/maintenance/repairs do you perform, especially on your own, ie, without the assistance of programs like Onyx, Tech Tool Pro, etc.?
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top