iSight adapater for tripods with threaded sled

Discussion in 'Video Hardware' started by Tim Murray, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <>,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that enables you to
    > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the Apple plastic
    > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use the disk alone
    > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    > >
    > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with several photos
    > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design affords many
    > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them made in China for
    > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    > >
    > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a chinese
    > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing that the item
    > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone send this out to a
    > > > > > machine shop?

    > >
    > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    > >
    > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    > >
    > > Golly, Ed.
    > >
    > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses and taps?

    >
    > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do not fall
    > into the category of machine shop. :p but i asked why you would send
    > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on the
    > order of $100 to set up).


    You call such people "rare".

    >
    > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    >
    > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a machine
    > shop. and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stock and a
    > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools. and i still wouldn't
    > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > d'uh. :D


    So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #21
    1. Advertisements

  2. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 7:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > In article
    > > > <>,

    >
    > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that enables you to
    > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the Apple plastic
    > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use the disk alone
    > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    >
    > > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with several photos
    > > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design affords many
    > > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them made in China for
    > > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    >
    > > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a chinese
    > > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing that theitem
    > > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone send this out to a
    > > > > > > machine shop?

    >
    > > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    >
    > > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    >
    > > > Golly, Ed.

    >
    > > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses and taps?

    >
    > > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do not fall
    > > into the category of machine shop.  :p  but i asked why you would send
    > > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on the
    > > order of $100 to set up).

    >
    > You call such people "rare".
    >
    > > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    >
    > > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a machine
    > > shop.  and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stock and a
    > > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools.  and i still wouldn't
    > > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > > d'uh.  :D

    >
    > So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...


    uh, no. follow along- i asked tim why anyone would farm such a job
    out to a machine shop; the quote he showed for 200 and 400 pieces as a
    ~$2k/~$4k job. we don't know what sort of order he ended up putting
    in, but my comment, in context (tough for you, i know), is clearly not
    to avoid a $6 job. if it was for a single $6 piece, the context
    obviously wouldn't be to ask why you'd farm it out to a machine shop
    (because, in context, you wouldn't- you'd buy it on ebay), eh? sheesh
    alan.
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #22
    1. Advertisements

  3. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 7:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <>,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > In article
    > > > > <>,

    > >
    > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that enables you
    > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the Apple
    > > > > > > > > plastic
    > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use the disk
    > > > > > > > > alone
    > > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    > >
    > > > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with several
    > > > > > > > > photos
    > > > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design affords many
    > > > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them made in China
    > > > > > > > > for
    > > > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    > >
    > > > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a chinese
    > > > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing that the
    > > > > > > > item
    > > > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone send this out to
    > > > > > > > a
    > > > > > > > machine shop?

    > >
    > > > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    > >
    > > > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    > >
    > > > > Golly, Ed.

    > >
    > > > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses and
    > > > > taps?

    > >
    > > > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do not fall
    > > > into the category of machine shop.  :p  but i asked why you would send
    > > > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > > > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on the
    > > > order of $100 to set up).

    > >
    > > You call such people "rare".
    > >
    > > > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    > >
    > > > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a machine
    > > > shop.  and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stock and a
    > > > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools.  and i still wouldn't
    > > > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > > > d'uh.  :D

    > >
    > > So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...

    >
    > uh, no. follow along- i asked tim why anyone would farm such a job
    > out to a machine shop; the quote he showed for 200 and 400 pieces as a
    > ~$2k/~$4k job. we don't know what sort of order he ended up putting
    > in, but my comment, in context (tough for you, i know), is clearly not
    > to avoid a $6 job. if it was for a single $6 piece, the context
    > obviously wouldn't be to ask why you'd farm it out to a machine shop
    > (because, in context, you wouldn't- you'd buy it on ebay), eh? sheesh
    > alan.


    Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    made.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #23
  4. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 7:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > In article
    > > > <>,

    >
    > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > In article
    > > > > > <>,

    >
    > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that enables you
    > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the Apple
    > > > > > > > > > plastic
    > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use the disk
    > > > > > > > > > alone
    > > > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    >
    > > > > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with several
    > > > > > > > > > photos
    > > > > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design affords many
    > > > > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them made in China
    > > > > > > > > > for
    > > > > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    >
    > > > > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a chinese
    > > > > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing thatthe
    > > > > > > > > item
    > > > > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone send this out to
    > > > > > > > > a
    > > > > > > > > machine shop?

    >
    > > > > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    >
    > > > > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    >
    > > > > > Golly, Ed.

    >
    > > > > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses and
    > > > > > taps?

    >
    > > > > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do not fall
    > > > > into the category of machine shop.  :p  but i asked why you would send
    > > > > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > > > > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on the
    > > > > order of $100 to set up).

    >
    > > > You call such people "rare".

    >
    > > > > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    >
    > > > > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a machine
    > > > > shop.  and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stock anda
    > > > > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools.  and i still wouldn't
    > > > > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > > > > d'uh.  :D

    >
    > > > So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...

    >
    > > uh, no.  follow along- i asked tim why anyone would farm such a job
    > > out to a machine shop; the quote he showed for 200 and 400 pieces as a
    > > ~$2k/~$4k job.  we don't know what sort of order he ended up putting
    > > in, but my comment, in context (tough for you, i know), is clearly not
    > > to avoid a $6 job.  if it was for a single $6 piece, the context
    > > obviously wouldn't be to ask why you'd farm it out to a machine shop
    > > (because, in context, you wouldn't- you'd buy it on ebay), eh?  sheesh
    > > alan.

    >
    > Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > made.


    you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #24
  5. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 7:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > In article
    > > > <>,

    >
    > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 7:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > In article
    > > > > > <>,

    >
    > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > In article
    > > > > > > > <>,

    >
    > > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <>wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that enables
    > > > > > > > > > > > you
    > > > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the Apple
    > > > > > > > > > > > plastic
    > > > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use thedisk
    > > > > > > > > > > > alone
    > > > > > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    >
    > > > > > > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with
    > > > > > > > > > > > several
    > > > > > > > > > > > photos
    > > > > > > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design affords
    > > > > > > > > > > > many
    > > > > > > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them madein
    > > > > > > > > > > > China
    > > > > > > > > > > > for
    > > > > > > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    >
    > > > > > > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a chinese
    > > > > > > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing that
    > > > > > > > > > > the
    > > > > > > > > > > item
    > > > > > > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone sendthis
    > > > > > > > > > > out to
    > > > > > > > > > > a
    > > > > > > > > > > machine shop?

    >
    > > > > > > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    >
    > > > > > > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    >
    > > > > > > > Golly, Ed.

    >
    > > > > > > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses and
    > > > > > > > taps?

    >
    > > > > > > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do notfall
    > > > > > > into the category of machine shop.  :p  but i asked why youwould
    > > > > > > send
    > > > > > > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > > > > > > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on the
    > > > > > > order of $100 to set up).

    >
    > > > > > You call such people "rare".

    >
    > > > > > > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    >
    > > > > > > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a
    > > > > > > machine
    > > > > > > shop.  and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stockand a
    > > > > > > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools.  and i still wouldn't
    > > > > > > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > > > > > > d'uh.  :D

    >
    > > > > > So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...

    >
    > > > > uh, no.  follow along- i asked tim why anyone would farm such a job
    > > > > out to a machine shop; the quote he showed for 200 and 400 pieces as a
    > > > > ~$2k/~$4k job.  we don't know what sort of order he ended up putting
    > > > > in, but my comment, in context (tough for you, i know), is clearly not
    > > > > to avoid a $6 job.  if it was for a single $6 piece, the context
    > > > > obviously wouldn't be to ask why you'd farm it out to a machine shop
    > > > > (because, in context, you wouldn't- you'd buy it on ebay), eh?  sheesh
    > > > > alan.

    >
    > > > Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > > > made.

    >
    > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    >
    > No, Ed.
    >
    > You never provided a real answer.
    >
    > If you want *one* threaded metal disk (and you happen to be a hobbyist
    > with a metal saw, drill press, taps (and a lathe to properly finish the
    > surfaces would be good too), then you make it yourself (or if you happen
    > to know friend with the tools, you might have him do it), but when you
    > want 200 pieces, a machine shop is precisely where you go.


    no, for one disk, i'd buy it for $6- you'd probably have a hard time
    finding raw stock that fits your need for less than that, and if you
    didn't have the tools, furgetaboutit..

    for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools. that's where you'd
    come out way ahead.

    but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a lathe
    to...? what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why? :p maybe
    that's why YOU'D use a machine shop... :D
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #25
  6. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 7:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <>,
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > In article
    > > > > <>,

    > >
    > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > On Mar 21, 7:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > In article
    > > > > > > <>,

    > >
    > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > On Mar 21, 7:03 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > In article
    > > > > > > > > <
    > > > > > > > > om>,

    > >
    > > > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > On Mar 21, 4:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > > > On Mar 20, 8:44 am, Tim Murray <>
    > > > > > > > > > > > wrote:
    > > > > > > > > > > > > I have had manufactured a threaded steel disk that
    > > > > > > > > > > > > enables
    > > > > > > > > > > > > you
    > > > > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > > > > your
    > > > > > > > > > > > > iSight to a threaded tripod sled. You can affix the
    > > > > > > > > > > > > Apple
    > > > > > > > > > > > > plastic
    > > > > > > > > > > > > mount
    > > > > > > > > > > > > to
    > > > > > > > > > > > > the disk and the disk to the sled; or you can use the
    > > > > > > > > > > > > disk
    > > > > > > > > > > > > alone
    > > > > > > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > > > > > > attach
    > > > > > > > > > > > > the iSight magnetic base.

    > >
    > > > > > > > > > > > > I have them for sale at eBay item 160404303393, with
    > > > > > > > > > > > > several
    > > > > > > > > > > > > photos
    > > > > > > > > > > > > of
    > > > > > > > > > > > > various configurations. Its brutally simple design
    > > > > > > > > > > > > affords
    > > > > > > > > > > > > many
    > > > > > > > > > > > > applications.
    > > > > > > > > > > > >  And for those who care, I could have had them made in
    > > > > > > > > > > > > China
    > > > > > > > > > > > > for
    > > > > > > > > > > > > cheap,
    > > > > > > > > > > > > but
    > > > > > > > > > > > > used a small Midwest machine shop instead.

    > >
    > > > > > > > > > > > other than the fact that the quote you showed from a
    > > > > > > > > > > > chinese
    > > > > > > > > > > > manufacturer appears to be more expensive, am i seeing
    > > > > > > > > > > > that
    > > > > > > > > > > > the
    > > > > > > > > > > > item
    > > > > > > > > > > > is just a threaded round disk?  why would anyone send
    > > > > > > > > > > > this
    > > > > > > > > > > > out to
    > > > > > > > > > > > a
    > > > > > > > > > > > machine shop?

    > >
    > > > > > > > > > > How do you suppose it would be made otherwise?

    > >
    > > > > > > > > > i'd buy a metal disk and use a drill press and a tap.  :p

    > >
    > > > > > > > > Golly, Ed.

    > >
    > > > > > > > > What do you suppose you call most people who have drill presses
    > > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > > taps?

    > >
    > > > > > > > golly gee alan, certainly most people with a drill press do not
    > > > > > > > fall
    > > > > > > > into the category of machine shop.  :p  but i asked why you would
    > > > > > > > send
    > > > > > > > this out to a machine shop (i.e. the insinuation is doing this
    > > > > > > > yourself w/ a press and tap- you're talking about something on
    > > > > > > > the
    > > > > > > > order of $100 to set up).

    > >
    > > > > > > You call such people "rare".

    > >
    > > > > > > > > And where do you buy "metal disks"?

    > >
    > > > > > > > strangely enough, i'd go to a metal supply house instead not a
    > > > > > > > machine
    > > > > > > > shop.  and if they couldn't source disks, i'd buy round stock and
    > > > > > > > a
    > > > > > > > cutoff wheel, putting me in at $200 for tools.  and i still
    > > > > > > > wouldn't
    > > > > > > > be a machine shop, and no normal person would confuse me for one.
    > > > > > > > d'uh.  :D

    > >
    > > > > > > So you'd spend $200 to avoid buying a $6.00 piece...

    > >
    > > > > > uh, no.  follow along- i asked tim why anyone would farm such a job
    > > > > > out to a machine shop; the quote he showed for 200 and 400 pieces as
    > > > > > a
    > > > > > ~$2k/~$4k job.  we don't know what sort of order he ended up putting
    > > > > > in, but my comment, in context (tough for you, i know), is clearly
    > > > > > not
    > > > > > to avoid a $6 job.  if it was for a single $6 piece, the context
    > > > > > obviously wouldn't be to ask why you'd farm it out to a machine shop
    > > > > > (because, in context, you wouldn't- you'd buy it on ebay), eh?
    > > > > >  sheesh
    > > > > > alan.

    > >
    > > > > Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > > > > made.

    > >
    > > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    > >
    > > No, Ed.
    > >
    > > You never provided a real answer.
    > >
    > > If you want *one* threaded metal disk (and you happen to be a hobbyist
    > > with a metal saw, drill press, taps (and a lathe to properly finish the
    > > surfaces would be good too), then you make it yourself (or if you happen
    > > to know friend with the tools, you might have him do it), but when you
    > > want 200 pieces, a machine shop is precisely where you go.

    >
    > no, for one disk, i'd buy it for $6- you'd probably have a hard time
    > finding raw stock that fits your need for less than that, and if you
    > didn't have the tools, furgetaboutit..


    Right. You'd buy it from the outfit that had it made...

    ....in a machine shop.

    >
    > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools. that's where you'd
    > come out way ahead.


    You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe) for
    $200?

    LOL

    >
    > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a lathe
    > to...? what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why? :p maybe
    > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop... :D


    So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    smooth?

    If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished thickness,
    use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #26
  7. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    <snip>
    > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where you'd
    > > come out way ahead.

    >
    > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe) for
    > $200?
    >
    > LOL


    you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw). that you
    would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    these matters. :D

    > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a lathe
    > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p  maybe
    > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    >
    > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > smooth?


    i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    need to be in quotes- it's a real thing. to get the face smooth, i'd
    keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    handling and use a sanding disk!

    > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished thickness,
    > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.


    wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that. ;D
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #27
  8. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > <snip>
    > > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where you'd
    > > > come out way ahead.

    > >
    > > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    > > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    > > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe) for
    > > $200?
    > >
    > > LOL

    >
    > you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    > for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    > angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw). that you
    > would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    > these matters. :D


    Prove it.

    Prove you can get a decent drill press, chop saw, and tap for $200...

    >
    > > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    > > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a lathe
    > > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    > > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p  maybe
    > > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    > >
    > > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    > > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > > smooth?

    >
    > i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    > need to be in quotes- it's a real thing. to get the face smooth, i'd
    > keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    > handling and use a sanding disk!


    I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    anything other than hack job.

    >
    > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished thickness,
    > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    >
    > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that. ;D


    We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.

    Can you cobble up something with a chop saw, hand drill, sandpaper and a
    tap. Yup.

    Could create something that people would want to *buy*?

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #28
  9. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 8:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > <snip>
    > > > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > > > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where you'd
    > > > > come out way ahead.

    >
    > > > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    > > > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    > > > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe) for
    > > > $200?

    >
    > > > LOL

    >
    > > you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    > > for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    > > angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw).  that you
    > > would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    > > these matters.  :D

    >
    > Prove it.
    >
    > Prove you can get a decent drill press, chop saw, and tap for $200...


    for a one off, i'd actually go way cheaper. i'd go to harbor freight
    and get these:
    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=38119
    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44829

    there are a LOT of good options in the $100 range for chop saws and
    small drill presses.
    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921817000P?keyword=drill+press
    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...splay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    i'd *personally* go used, and find something on craigslist though. a
    whole lot of seriously high quality tools for very good prices these
    days.

    for a tap, $6.
    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P

    you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    multiple tapS. :p

    > > > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    > > > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a lathe
    > > > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe,and
    > > > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p  maybe
    > > > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    >
    > > > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    > > > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > > > smooth?

    >
    > > i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    > > need to be in quotes- it's a real thing.  to get the face smooth, i'd
    > > keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    > > handling and use a sanding disk!

    >
    > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    > anything other than hack job.


    but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    stock?

    > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished thickness,
    > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    >
    > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    >
    > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.


    this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed- you thought
    you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    yourself. :p

    > Can you cobble up something with a chop saw, hand drill, sandpaper and a
    > tap. Yup.
    >
    > Could create something that people would want to *buy*?


    go take a look at the pictures from tim's action- pay extra attention
    to the edges of the disks. you really think that was something that
    was precision machined, and not something you could do w/ a drill
    press, chop saw, and some light sanding?
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #29
  10. Tim Murray

    Tim Murray Guest

    ed wrote:
    > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    >> made.

    >
    > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?


    Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most weekends, and
    I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, I can't screw
    around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the darned
    thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how much I ended up
    paying per piece, but it was under $6.) The money I'd lose in my regular
    work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.
     
    Tim Murray, Mar 22, 2010
    #30
  11. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 9:06 pm, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > ed wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > >> made.

    >
    > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    >
    > Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most weekends, and
    > I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, I can't screw
    > around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the darned
    > thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how much I endedup
    > paying per piece, but it was under $6.)  The money I'd lose in my regular
    > work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.


    understood, but not really what's really being debated at this
    point. it's just that alan doesn't know what he's talking about at
    this point. :p i.e. it's just about good fun right now. :D
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #31
  12. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 8:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > <snip>
    > > > > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > > > > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where you'd
    > > > > > come out way ahead.

    > >
    > > > > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    > > > > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    > > > > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe) for
    > > > > $200?

    > >
    > > > > LOL

    > >
    > > > you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    > > > for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    > > > angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw).  that you
    > > > would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    > > > these matters.  :D

    > >
    > > Prove it.
    > >
    > > Prove you can get a decent drill press, chop saw, and tap for $200...

    >
    > for a one off, i'd actually go way cheaper. i'd go to harbor freight
    > and get these:
    > http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=38119
    > http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44829
    >
    > there are a LOT of good options in the $100 range for chop saws and
    > small drill presses.
    > http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921817000P?keyword=drill+press
    > http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xhc/R-100642072/h_d2/ProductDisplay?lan
    > gId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053


    Wow. You've shown you can buy crap to make crap.

    Rule #1 about tools: if you really need it, then buy it.

    Rule #2: don't buy crap.

    >
    > i'd *personally* go used, and find something on craigslist though. a
    > whole lot of seriously high quality tools for very good prices these
    > days.


    With no warranties and uncertain reliability.

    >
    > for a tap, $6.
    > http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P
    >
    > you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    > multiple tapS. :p
    >
    > > > > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part (you
    > > > > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a
    > > > > > lathe
    > > > > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    > > > > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p  maybe
    > > > > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    > >
    > > > > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    > > > > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > > > > smooth?

    > >
    > > > i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    > > > need to be in quotes- it's a real thing.  to get the face smooth, i'd
    > > > keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    > > > handling and use a sanding disk!

    > >
    > > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    > > anything other than hack job.

    >
    > but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    > *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    > stock?
    >
    > > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    > > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished
    > > > > thickness,
    > > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    > > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    > >
    > > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    > >
    > > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.

    >
    > this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    > thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed- you thought
    > you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    > yourself. :p


    I never said anything like that.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #32
  13. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 9:06 pm, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > ed wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > > >> made.

    > >
    > > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    > >
    > > Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most weekends,
    > > and
    > > I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, I can't
    > > screw
    > > around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the darned
    > > thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how much I ended
    > > up
    > > paying per piece, but it was under $6.)  The money I'd lose in my regular
    > > work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.

    >
    > understood, but not really what's really being debated at this
    > point. it's just that alan doesn't know what he's talking about at
    > this point. :p i.e. it's just about good fun right now. :D


    LOL

    I know that to make items in bulk, you go to people who are good at it.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #33
  14. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 9:20 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 8:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > <snip>
    > > > > > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for something
    > > > > > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where you'd
    > > > > > > come out way ahead.

    >
    > > > > > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah, metal
    > > > > > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff wheel
    > > > > > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe)for
    > > > > > $200?

    >
    > > > > > LOL

    >
    > > > > you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    > > > > for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    > > > > angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw).  that you
    > > > > would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    > > > > these matters.  :D

    >
    > > > Prove it.

    >
    > > > Prove you can get a decent drill press, chop saw, and tap for $200...

    >
    > > for a one off, i'd actually go way cheaper. i'd go to harbor freight
    > > and get these:
    > >http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=38119
    > >http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44829

    >
    > > there are a LOT of good options in the $100 range for chop saws and
    > > small drill presses.
    > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921817000P?keyword=drill+p....
    > >http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xhc/R-100642072/h_d2/ProductDi...
    > > gId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    >
    > Wow. You've shown you can buy crap to make crap.
    >
    > Rule #1 about tools: if you really need it, then buy it.
    >
    > Rule #2: don't buy crap.


    none of those tools are crap. they have limitations, like all tools,
    but that doesn't make them crap.

    > > i'd *personally* go used, and find something on craigslist though.  a
    > > whole lot of seriously high quality tools for very good prices these
    > > days.

    >
    > With no warranties and uncertain reliability.


    caveat emptor of course- as i said, that's what i'd personally do.
    based on the statements you've made, i'd not recommend you do
    that. ;D

    > > for a tap, $6.
    > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P

    >
    > > you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    > > multiple tapS.  :p


    still no explanation? :D

    > > > > > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part(you
    > > > > > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a
    > > > > > > lathe
    > > > > > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe, and
    > > > > > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p  maybe
    > > > > > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    >
    > > > > > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off the
    > > > > > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > > > > > smooth?

    >
    > > > > i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    > > > > need to be in quotes- it's a real thing.  to get the face smooth,i'd
    > > > > keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    > > > > handling and use a sanding disk!

    >
    > > > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    > > > anything other than hack job.

    >
    > > but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    > > *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    > > stock?


    well, why did you bring up an angle grinder, and what would you use
    alan?

    > > > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd start
    > > > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished
    > > > > > thickness,
    > > > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted) use a
    > > > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    >
    > > > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > > > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    >
    > > > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.

    >
    > > this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    > > thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed-  you thought
    > > you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    > > yourself.  :p

    >
    > I never said anything like that.


    you absolutely did.
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.advocacy/msg/3b606b99804df4f7
    alan:
    "And I though a box section was -- you know -- boxed in.
    Five sides isn't six sides, ed. "
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #34
  15. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 9:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 9:06 pm, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > ed wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > > > >> made.

    >
    > > > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    >
    > > > Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most weekends,
    > > > and
    > > > I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, I can't
    > > > screw
    > > > around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the darned
    > > > thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how much I ended
    > > > up
    > > > paying per piece, but it was under $6.)  The money I'd lose in my regular
    > > > work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.

    >
    > > understood, but not really what's really being debated at this
    > > point.   it's just that alan doesn't know what he's talking about at
    > > this point.  :p  i.e. it's just about good fun right now.  :D

    >
    > LOL
    >
    > I know that to make items in bulk, you go to people who are good at it.


    well then, something else you apparently don't know- most machine
    shops aren't really in the business of making parts in bulk. ;D most
    of them generally do everything by hand, so by definition do one offs
    or limited runs. :p
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #35
  16. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 9:20 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 8:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > > On Mar 21, 8:09 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > <snip>
    > > > > > > > for 200 disks with a threaded hole, i'd make it myself for
    > > > > > > > something
    > > > > > > > so trivial, even if i had to go buy the tools.  that's where
    > > > > > > > you'd
    > > > > > > > come out way ahead.

    > >
    > > > > > > You think you can buy a decent drill press and metal saw (yeah,
    > > > > > > metal
    > > > > > > saw; you're not going to get a uniform disk by mounting a cutoff
    > > > > > > wheel
    > > > > > > in an angle grinder, you know) and taps (putting aside the lathe)
    > > > > > > for
    > > > > > > $200?

    > >
    > > > > > > LOL

    > >
    > > > > > you absolutely can get a chop saw, tap, and a drill press good enough
    > > > > > for a project like this. and while you CAN put a cut off wheel in a
    > > > > > angle grinder, i certainly wouldn't (i'd use a chop saw).  that you
    > > > > > would go to an angle grinder speaks volumes about your experience in
    > > > > > these matters.  :D

    > >
    > > > > Prove it.

    > >
    > > > > Prove you can get a decent drill press, chop saw, and tap for $200...

    > >
    > > > for a one off, i'd actually go way cheaper. i'd go to harbor freight
    > > > and get these:
    > > >http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=38119
    > > >http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44829

    > >
    > > > there are a LOT of good options in the $100 range for chop saws and
    > > > small drill presses.
    > > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00921817000P?keyword=drill+p...
    > > >http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xhc/R-100642072/h_d2/ProductDi...
    > > > gId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    > >
    > > Wow. You've shown you can buy crap to make crap.
    > >
    > > Rule #1 about tools: if you really need it, then buy it.
    > >
    > > Rule #2: don't buy crap.

    >
    > none of those tools are crap. they have limitations, like all tools,
    > but that doesn't make them crap.


    Please.

    They're crap.

    >
    > > > i'd *personally* go used, and find something on craigslist though.  a
    > > > whole lot of seriously high quality tools for very good prices these
    > > > days.

    > >
    > > With no warranties and uncertain reliability.

    >
    > caveat emptor of course- as i said, that's what i'd personally do.
    > based on the statements you've made, i'd not recommend you do
    > that. ;D
    >
    > > > for a tap, $6.
    > > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P

    > >
    > > > you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    > > > multiple tapS.  :p

    >
    > still no explanation? :D


    Is one really needed? One typically buys taps in sets.

    >
    > > > > > > > but what do you imagine you'd use a lathe for to make this part
    > > > > > > > (you
    > > > > > > > apparently think you'd use a drill to cut off a disk, and then a
    > > > > > > > lathe
    > > > > > > > to...?  what surfaces do you think you're finishing on the lathe,
    > > > > > > > and
    > > > > > > > how?), and why would you use multiple taps- really, why?  :p
    > > > > > > >  maybe
    > > > > > > > that's why YOU'D use a machine shop...  :D

    > >
    > > > > > > So after you've used the "cutoff wheel" you mentioned to cut off
    > > > > > > the
    > > > > > > disk from the round stock, you'd do what to get the faces and edges
    > > > > > > smooth?

    > >
    > > > > > i ain't using a lathe, that's for sure. and "cutoff wheel" doesn't
    > > > > > need to be in quotes- it's a real thing.  to get the face smooth, i'd
    > > > > > keep it simple- thread a rod into the hole i just tapped for easy
    > > > > > handling and use a sanding disk!

    > >
    > > > > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    > > > > anything other than hack job.

    > >
    > > > but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    > > > *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    > > > stock?

    >
    > well, why did you bring up an angle grinder, and what would you use
    > alan?


    LOL

    >
    > > > > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd
    > > > > > > start
    > > > > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished
    > > > > > > thickness,
    > > > > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted)
    > > > > > > use a
    > > > > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    > >
    > > > > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > > > > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    > >
    > > > > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.

    > >
    > > > this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    > > > thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed-  you thought
    > > > you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    > > > yourself.  :p

    > >
    > > I never said anything like that.

    >
    > you absolutely did.
    > http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.advocacy/msg/3b606b99804df4f7
    > alan:
    > "And I though a box section was -- you know -- boxed in.
    > Five sides isn't six sides, ed. "



    Nope. Context, Ed. Look it up.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #36
  17. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 9:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > On Mar 21, 9:06 pm, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > ed wrote:
    > > > > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metal piece
    > > > > >> made.

    > >
    > > > > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    > >
    > > > > Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most
    > > > > weekends,
    > > > > and
    > > > > I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, I can't
    > > > > screw
    > > > > around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the
    > > > > darned
    > > > > thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how much I
    > > > > ended
    > > > > up
    > > > > paying per piece, but it was under $6.)  The money I'd lose in my
    > > > > regular
    > > > > work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.

    > >
    > > > understood, but not really what's really being debated at this
    > > > point.   it's just that alan doesn't know what he's talking about at
    > > > this point.  :p  i.e. it's just about good fun right now.  :D

    > >
    > > LOL
    > >
    > > I know that to make items in bulk, you go to people who are good at it.

    >
    > well then, something else you apparently don't know- most machine
    > shops aren't really in the business of making parts in bulk. ;D most
    > of them generally do everything by hand, so by definition do one offs
    > or limited runs. :p


    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOL

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #37
  18. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 9:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >  ed <> wrote:

    <snip>
    > > > Wow. You've shown you can buy crap to make crap.

    >
    > > > Rule #1 about tools: if you really need it, then buy it.

    >
    > > > Rule #2: don't buy crap.

    >
    > > none of those tools are crap.  they have limitations, like all tools,
    > > but that doesn't make them crap.

    >
    > Please.
    >
    > They're crap.


    nope. i've tapped a replacement for something much more complex than
    the part in question w/ a similar hf press with no issues. i build a
    replacement for one of these:
    http://www.vortexracing.com/index.p...srctype=detail&refno=19381&category=Rear Sets

    a disc with a threaded hole obviously doesn't need anything resembling
    the same precision, eh?

    <snip>
    > > > > for a tap, $6.
    > > > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P

    >
    > > > > you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    > > > > multiple tapS.  :p

    >
    > > still no explanation?  :D

    >
    > Is one really needed? One typically buys taps in sets.


    if you're going to be tapping a lot of stuff. i've never bought them
    in sets (both that i have). :p

    <snip>
    > > > > > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for creating
    > > > > > anything other than hack job.

    >
    > > > > but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    > > > > *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    > > > > stock?

    >
    > > well, why did you bring up an angle grinder, and what would you use
    > > alan?

    >
    > LOL



    no, really, how about an answer?


    > > > > > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd
    > > > > > > > start
    > > > > > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished
    > > > > > > > thickness,
    > > > > > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already mounted)
    > > > > > > > use a
    > > > > > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    >
    > > > > > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more work
    > > > > > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    >
    > > > > > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really understand.

    >
    > > > > this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    > > > > thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed-  you thought
    > > > > you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    > > > > yourself.  :p

    >
    > > > I never said anything like that.

    >
    > > you absolutely did.
    > >http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.advocacy/msg/3b606b99804d...
    > > alan:
    > > "And I though a box section was -- you know -- boxed in.
    > > Five sides isn't six sides, ed. "

    >
    > Nope. Context, Ed. Look it up.


    the context clearly showed that you thought a box section needed to be
    enclosed (i.e. boxed in).
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #38
  19. Tim Murray

    ed Guest

    On Mar 21, 9:40 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    >  ed <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 21, 9:21 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > >  ed <> wrote:
    > > > > On Mar 21, 9:06 pm, Tim Murray <> wrote:
    > > > > > ed wrote:
    > > > > > > On Mar 21, 7:34 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > > > > > >> Machines shops are where one goes to get 200 pieces of a metalpiece
    > > > > > >> made.

    >
    > > > > > > you've gone around in a nice circle, eh alan?

    >
    > > > > > Let me jump in here. I work many hours during the day and most
    > > > > > weekends,
    > > > > > and
    > > > > > I bill by the hour and most of it is on a tight deadline; thus, Ican't
    > > > > > screw
    > > > > > around with buying the equipment and raw material, then making the
    > > > > > darned
    > > > > > thing, for 200 of an under-six-dollar item. (I won't say how muchI
    > > > > > ended
    > > > > > up
    > > > > > paying per piece, but it was under $6.)  The money I'd lose in my
    > > > > > regular
    > > > > > work would dwarf the money I "saved" in doing myself.

    >
    > > > > understood, but not really what's really being debated at this
    > > > > point.   it's just that alan doesn't know what he's talking aboutat
    > > > > this point.  :p  i.e. it's just about good fun right now.  :D

    >
    > > > LOL

    >
    > > > I know that to make items in bulk, you go to people who are good at it.

    >
    > > well then, something else you apparently don't know- most machine
    > > shops aren't really in the business of making parts in bulk.  ;D  most
    > > of them generally do everything by hand, so by definition do one offs
    > > or limited runs.  :p

    >
    > LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLLOLOLOLLOLOLOL


    sorry alan, but it's true. have you ever had *any* work done at a
    machine shop? if so, what? if not, maybe just admit you don't know
    and bow out of the conversation gracefully, eh? :p
     
    ed, Mar 22, 2010
    #39
  20. Tim Murray

    Alan Baker Guest

    In article
    <>,
    ed <> wrote:

    > On Mar 21, 9:39 pm, Alan Baker <> wrote:
    > >  ed <> wrote:

    > <snip>
    > > > > Wow. You've shown you can buy crap to make crap.

    > >
    > > > > Rule #1 about tools: if you really need it, then buy it.

    > >
    > > > > Rule #2: don't buy crap.

    > >
    > > > none of those tools are crap.  they have limitations, like all tools,
    > > > but that doesn't make them crap.

    > >
    > > Please.
    > >
    > > They're crap.

    >
    > nope. i've tapped a replacement for something much more complex than
    > the part in question w/ a similar hf press with no issues. i build a
    > replacement for one of these:
    > http://www.vortexracing.com/index.php?src=directory&view=Products&srctype=deta
    > il&refno=19381&category=Rear%20Sets
    >
    > a disc with a threaded hole obviously doesn't need anything resembling
    > the same precision, eh?


    That one can make crap work on occasion...

    ....doesn't mean it isn't crap.

    >
    > <snip>
    > > > > > for a tap, $6.
    > > > > >http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952847000P

    > >
    > > > > > you still haven't explained why you initially thought you needed
    > > > > > multiple tapS.  :p

    > >
    > > > still no explanation?  :D

    > >
    > > Is one really needed? One typically buys taps in sets.

    >
    > if you're going to be tapping a lot of stuff. i've never bought them
    > in sets (both that i have). :p
    >
    > <snip>
    > > > > > > I know it's a real thing. It's just an inappropriate tool for
    > > > > > > creating
    > > > > > > anything other than hack job.

    > >
    > > > > > but you brought up a *angle grinder*?! what do you think is the
    > > > > > *appropriate* tool one would use for cutting off disks from round
    > > > > > stock?

    > >
    > > > well, why did you bring up an angle grinder, and what would you use
    > > > alan?

    > >
    > > LOL

    >
    >
    > no, really, how about an answer?


    LOL

    >
    >
    > > > > > > > > If I were trying to make them (and I had the proper tools), I'd
    > > > > > > > > start
    > > > > > > > > with round stock, cut it to a little bit larger than finished
    > > > > > > > > thickness,
    > > > > > > > > use a lathe to true up the faces and (since its already
    > > > > > > > > mounted)
    > > > > > > > > use a
    > > > > > > > > drill bit in the tailstock to make the centre hole. Then tap.

    > >
    > > > > > > > wow, i guess if you wanted to do a lot more setup and a lot more
    > > > > > > > work
    > > > > > > > than necessary, you could do it a really dumb way like that.  ;D

    > >
    > > > > > > We'll just write this up as something else you don't really
    > > > > > > understand.

    > >
    > > > > > this is like the discussion we had on box sections, where you really
    > > > > > thought that a box section needed to be fully enclosed-  you thought
    > > > > > you were right through and through while making a total fool of
    > > > > > yourself.  :p

    > >
    > > > > I never said anything like that.

    > >
    > > > you absolutely did.
    > > >http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.mac.advocacy/msg/3b606b99804d...
    > > > alan:
    > > > "And I though a box section was -- you know -- boxed in.
    > > > Five sides isn't six sides, ed. "

    > >
    > > Nope. Context, Ed. Look it up.

    >
    > the context clearly showed that you thought a box section needed to be
    > enclosed (i.e. boxed in).


    Nope.

    It needs to be a box *section* in the appropriate directions for the
    loads it must resist.

    --
    "The iPhone doesn't have a speaker phone" -- "I checked very carefully" --
    "I checked Apple's web pages" -- Edwin on the iPhone
    "It is Mac OS X, not BSD.' -- 'From Mac OS to BSD Unix." -- "It's BSD Unix with Apple's APIs and GUI on top of it' -- 'nothing but BSD Unix' (Edwin on Mac OS X)
    '[The IBM PC] could boot multiple OS, such as DOS, C/PM, GEM, etc.' --
    'I claimed nothing about GEM other than it was available software for the
    IBM PC. (Edwin on GEM)
    'Solaris is just a marketing rename of Sun OS.' -- 'Sun OS is not included
    on the timeline of Solaris because it's a different OS.' (Edwin on Sun)
     
    Alan Baker, Mar 22, 2010
    #40
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