Format a Jump Drive HFS vs. FAT32/exFAT

Discussion in 'Mac' started by Justin, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. Justin

    Justin Guest

    How well does Snow Leopard handle FAT volumes? Is it reliable? I have
    a jumpdrive here with a bunch of old pictures on it, and some of them
    were corrupt. I copied everything onto another brand new drive. Once I
    reformatted the troublesome drive it seems to work just fine.
    I'd like to have cross platform support, since this is going to be an
    archive and I won't access it for years; and who knows what OS I'll be
    using in 10+ years - Linux?
    Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?
     
    Justin, Jul 21, 2011
    #1
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  2. Justin

    dorayme Guest

    In article <j07vdj$2kt$>,
    Justin <> wrote:

    > How well does Snow Leopard handle FAT volumes? Is it reliable? I have
    > a jumpdrive here with a bunch of old pictures on it, and some of them
    > were corrupt. I copied everything onto another brand new drive. Once I
    > reformatted the troublesome drive it seems to work just fine.
    > I'd like to have cross platform support, since this is going to be an
    > archive and I won't access it for years; and who knows what OS I'll be
    > using in 10+ years - Linux?
    > Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?


    Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 21, 2011
    #2
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  3. Justin

    Justin Guest

    On 7/20/11 11:00 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > In article<j07vdj$2kt$>,
    > Justin<> wrote:
    >
    >> How well does Snow Leopard handle FAT volumes? Is it reliable? I have
    >> a jumpdrive here with a bunch of old pictures on it, and some of them
    >> were corrupt. I copied everything onto another brand new drive. Once I
    >> reformatted the troublesome drive it seems to work just fine.
    >> I'd like to have cross platform support, since this is going to be an
    >> archive and I won't access it for years; and who knows what OS I'll be
    >> using in 10+ years - Linux?
    >> Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?

    >
    > Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.
    >


    That's what I was thinking...
    What about exFAT for > 2GB volumes?
     
    Justin, Jul 21, 2011
    #3
  4. In article <j085ts$1sh$>,
    Justin <> wrote:

    > On 7/20/11 11:00 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > > In article<j07vdj$2kt$>,
    > > Justin<> wrote:
    > >
    > >> How well does Snow Leopard handle FAT volumes? Is it reliable? I have
    > >> a jumpdrive here with a bunch of old pictures on it, and some of them
    > >> were corrupt. I copied everything onto another brand new drive. Once I
    > >> reformatted the troublesome drive it seems to work just fine.
    > >> I'd like to have cross platform support, since this is going to be an
    > >> archive and I won't access it for years; and who knows what OS I'll be
    > >> using in 10+ years - Linux?
    > >> Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?

    > >
    > > Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.
    > >

    >
    > That's what I was thinking...
    > What about exFAT for > 2GB volumes?


    Nope. If you want files sizes > 2GB, it has to be NTFS. AFAIK, MacOS
    can only read NTFS without 3rd-party drivers installed. That may have
    changed since 10.5 and I'm sure someone will jump in and correct me if I
    got it wrong.

    --
    DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...
    [I filter all Goggle Groups posts, so any reply may be automatically ignored]
     
    Michael Vilain, Jul 21, 2011
    #4
  5. Justin

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Michael
    Vilain <> wrote:

    > > >> Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?
    > > >
    > > > Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.
    > > >

    > > That's what I was thinking...
    > > What about exFAT for > 2GB volumes?

    >
    > Nope. If you want files sizes > 2GB, it has to be NTFS.


    4 gig is the limit for fat32.

    exfat is *much* higher (they don't make usb sticks that big).

    > AFAIK, MacOS
    > can only read NTFS without 3rd-party drivers installed. That may have
    > changed since 10.5 and I'm sure someone will jump in and correct me if I
    > got it wrong.


    that part is correct.
     
    nospam, Jul 21, 2011
    #5
  6. Justin

    dorayme Guest

    In article <210720111320541259%>,
    nospam <> wrote:

    > In article <>, Michael
    > Vilain <> wrote:
    >
    > > > >> Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?
    > > > >
    > > > > Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.
    > > > >
    > > > That's what I was thinking...
    > > > What about exFAT for > 2GB volumes?

    > >
    > > Nope. If you want files sizes > 2GB, it has to be NTFS.

    >
    > 4 gig is the limit for fat32


    Presumably why my digital TV set-top box (which has USB recording
    software and a port for USB sticks and hard disks) records long
    movies in sections with an index and software to play them all in
    sequence back as if all one.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Jul 22, 2011
    #6
  7. Justin

    Paul Sture Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2011-07-20 23:20 , Justin wrote:
    > > On 7/20/11 11:00 PM, dorayme wrote:
    > >> In article<j07vdj$2kt$>,
    > >> Justin<> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> How well does Snow Leopard handle FAT volumes? Is it reliable? I have
    > >>> a jumpdrive here with a bunch of old pictures on it, and some of them
    > >>> were corrupt. I copied everything onto another brand new drive. Once I
    > >>> reformatted the troublesome drive it seems to work just fine.
    > >>> I'd like to have cross platform support, since this is going to be an
    > >>> archive and I won't access it for years; and who knows what OS I'll be
    > >>> using in 10+ years - Linux?
    > >>> Anyway... should I format it to HFS or FAT?
    > >>
    > >> Just format it FAT32 and it will be fine.
    > >>

    > >
    > > That's what I was thinking...
    > > What about exFAT for > 2GB volumes?

    >
    > NTFS + MacFUSE (For Mac's at least - for Linux (which wants to be like
    > OS X when it grows up) you're screwed (AFAIK).


    MacFUSE gives me the ability to read NTFS, but unless I'm missing
    something, I can't write to NTFS from my Mac.

    FUSE stands for File System in Userspace, and is available on Linux.

    My versions of Linux use FUSE to write to NTFS, but due to wrong
    assumptions about disk geometry you'll probably find that when you plug
    the disk into a Windows system, Windows will fire up CHKDSK to repair th
    disk. It's even worse if you use something like GParted to create an
    NTFS file system.

    From:
    <http://www.thpc.info/how/shrink_partition_in_windows_7_vista.html>

    "Windows partition editors often use a different disk geometry than that
    used in Linux. Many users would be tempted to use a third-party
    partitioning utility like the free and excellent GParted. Unfortunately
    Windows 7/Vista may become unbootable - the MFT may be destroyed and the
    hidden sectors value may not be updated."

    --
    Paul Sture
     
    Paul Sture, Jul 22, 2011
    #7
  8. Justin

    Paul Sture Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    >
    > If you have an external drive that you need to be readable on both Mac
    > and PC, then NTFS is the way to go. Just add MacFUSE to the Mac to
    > enable write ability (Mac -> NTFS).


    As I said in my other post I can't write to NTFS using MacFUSE. Did you
    do something specific to enable writing?

    > For Linux read/writability you may need to stick to FAT32 - unless there
    > is a utility similar to MacFUSE for Linux.


    FUSE is there by default on Ubuntu and its derivatives and Fedora.
    Probably other distributions as well.

    > But really why go to Linux when there's OS X?


    *cough splutter cough* Samba/CIFS, which has gone away with Lion ?

    > And really: do you think a hard disk from today will likely be in use in
    > 10 years? Your files will have moved on to other disk space.


    10 year old disks are still used in the enterprise space, on the "If it
    ain't broke, don't fix it" principle.

    --
    Paul Sture
     
    Paul Sture, Jul 22, 2011
    #8
  9. Justin

    Paul Sture Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2011-07-22 04:05 , Paul Sture wrote:
    > > In article<>,
    > > Alan Browne<> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> If you have an external drive that you need to be readable on both Mac
    > >> and PC, then NTFS is the way to go. Just add MacFUSE to the Mac to
    > >> enable write ability (Mac -> NTFS).

    > >
    > > As I said in my other post I can't write to NTFS using MacFUSE. Did you
    > > do something specific to enable writing?

    >
    > Sorry. Neglected to add:
    >
    > http://macntfs-3g.blogspot.com/


    Thanks. 25 Euros I can live with, especially considering the licensing
    model:

    "Tuxera¹s licensing model is one person = one license. With one license
    you can copy the software to your every personal computer. So it is
    enough to have one license to install the software on your three Macs at
    home. But if you have a three-person company, you need three licenses,
    one for every person.

    The license key is forever license which means that you can use the
    license key for all future Tuxera NTFS for Mac products. Please note,
    this may be a time-limited possibility."

    >
    > >> For Linux read/writability you may need to stick to FAT32 - unless there
    > >> is a utility similar to MacFUSE for Linux.

    > >
    > > FUSE is there by default on Ubuntu and its derivatives and Fedora.
    > > Probably other distributions as well.
    > >
    > >> But really why go to Linux when there's OS X?

    > >
    > > *cough splutter cough* Samba/CIFS, which has gone away with Lion ?

    >
    > Most (great majority) of Mac users could care less about Linux. Most
    > Mac users are not computer nerds. (Neither am I).


    I was thinking about business users...

    But there are a lot of NAS devices out there which are available to Joe
    Public, and many of them rely on Samba. Here's an example:

    <http://www.reghardware.com/2011/07/22/review_apple_mac_os_x_lion/page3.h
    tml>

    "It turns out Apple has changed its support for AFP connections, as used
    by lots of Nas drives. Although I can still connect via SMB and CIFS,
    there¹s little I can do about accessing my Nas volumes from the
    left-hand panel in Finder windows, nor can I configure TimeMachine not
    to use AFP. Basically, the moment I installed OS X Lion, my backups
    ceased. I await Buffalo Technology¹s firmware update to fix this."

    I suspect there's another solution available here, but may be wrong.

    --
    Paul Sture
     
    Paul Sture, Jul 23, 2011
    #9
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